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Statements On Introduced Bills And Joint Resolutions

By Mrs. FEINSTEIN (for herself and Mr. Fitzgerald):

S. 2016. A bill to provide for infant crib safety, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein

legislator photo

Mr. President. I rise along with Senator Fitzgerald to reintroduce the Infant Crib Safety Act. This legislation is designed to reduce injuries and deaths that come from infant crib accidents.

Earch year, about 11,500 children ages 2 and under are injured in cribs seriously enough to require hospital treatment. Approximately, 26 children die a year from such injuries, the highest number of deaths caused by nursery-related products.

In fact, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, cribs cause more deaths than all other nursery items combined.

While strict guidelines exist on the manufacture of and sale of new cribs, there are millions of cribs sold throughout the U.S. in ``secondary markets'' such as thrift stores and resale furniture stores.

As many as half of the 4 million infants born in this country each year are placed in second hand cribs. Many of these used cribs are unsafe and should be taken off the market and either repaired or destroyed.

These used cribs can have dangerous features such as protruding corner post extensions, missing or broken parts, excessive slat width, poor fitting crib sheets, inadequate mattress supports, latches that do not prevent unintentional collapse of the crib. Cribs built before 1978 have a higher lead content than current regulations allow.

Let me give you some of the real life examples of the tragedies caused by unsafe cribs.

At the age of 23 months, Danny Lineweaver was injured during an attempt to climb out of his crib. Danny caught his shirt on a decorative knob on the cornerpost of his crib and hanged himself. Though his mother was able to perform CPR the moment she found him, Danny lived in a semi-comatose state for 9 years and died in 1993.

In another case, Luke Torgerson, a 13-month-old infant, died due to an unsafe crib at this daycare facility in Minnesota.

Parents should have confidence that a crib is a safe place to leave an infant. The design and construction of a baby crib must ensure that it is safe to leave an infant while sleeping.

Since cribs are the only juvenile product manufactured expressly for leaving a child unattended, every necessary measure should be taken to ensure that the crib is the safest possible environment.

The Infant Crib Safety Act keeps unsafe secondhand or hand-me-down cribs out of the stream of commerce by prohibiting their sale, resale, lease, and use in lodging facilities or day care centers.

This bill does not apply to individuals who provide cribs to their friends, or to any type of individual sale of a crib such as at a garage sale. The bill focuses on commercial users. And currently, controls over cribs provided by transient public lodging establishments or sold at thrift stores are non-existent.

Studies have shown that hotels and motels continue to use unsafe cribs and thrift stores continue to sell them. In the year 2000, the National Safe Kids Campaign did an investigation of cribs used by hotels and motels. Spot checks by the Campaign identified unsafe cribs in 80 percent of the cribs visited.

A year earlier, the Consumer Product Safety Commission found that 12 percent of the cribs sold in a survey of thrift stores did not meet existing voluntary industry or Federal safety standards for new cribs.

Comparable legislation has already been adopted by a number of States. Eleven States including Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Washington have already passed legislation prohibiting the sale of cribs that do not meet current safety standards.

There is no good reason why cribs in all 50 States should not meet these reasonable safety standards.

The legislation is supported by the Consumer Federation of America and the Danny Foundation.

By Mr. SANTORUM:

S. 2017. A bill to designate the United States courthouse and post office building located at 93 Atocha Street in Ponce, Puerto Rico, and the ``Luis A. Ferre United States Courthouse and Post Office Building''; to the Committee on Governmental Affairs.

Mr. President, I rise today to introduce a bill to designate the United States courthouse and post office building at 93 Atocha Street in Ponce, Puerto Rico as the ``Luis A. Ferre Courthouse and Post Office Building.'' This legislation is meant to honor the distinguished life and career of Mr. Luis A. Ferre, a dedicated statesman and humanitarian of Puerto Rico.

Luis A. Ferre was born in 1904 in Ponce, Puerto Rico. During his remarkable career, Mr. Ferre was a member of the Constitutional Convention of Puerto Rico in 1951, a member of the House of Representatives of Puerto Rico from 1953-1956, Governor of Puerto Rico from 1969-1972, as well as the President of the Senate of Puerto Rico from 1977-1980. Perhaps most remarkable, however, was his commitment to humanitarian and philanthropic activities, which included the founding of the Ponce Public Library and the Ponce Museum of Art.

In addition to serving the people of Puerto Rico, this building will stand as a reminder of the dedicated service Luis A. Ferre provided to all Puerto Ricans.

By Mr. BUNNING:

S. 2018. A bill to amend the National Trails System Act to extend the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail to include additional sites associated with the preparation or return phase of the expedition, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the text of the bill be printed in the Record.

There being no objection, the bill was ordered to be printed in the Record, as follows:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

By Mrs. BOXER (for herself, Mr. Corzine, Mrs. Murray, Mr. Lautenberg, Mrs. Clinton, Ms. Cantwell, Mr. Jeffords, Mr. Lieberman, Mrs. Feinstein, Mr. Sarbanes, and Ms. Mikulski):

S. 2020. A bill to prohibit, consistent with Roe v. Wade, the interference by the government with a woman's right to choose to bear a child or terminate a pregnancy, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

Mr. President, today, I am proud to introduce the Freedom of Choice Act. Thirty-one years ago, the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Roe v. Wade. It was a monumental day for women because for the first time, a woman's right to choose whether or not to continue a pregnancy was protected under the constitutional right to privacy. Roe v. Wade has kept women from being forced to continue pregnancies that could endanger their health or render them infertile. And for the past 31 years, countless lives have been saved by getting women out of back alleys and into safe, clean and legally protected facilities. That is why I have been fighting throughout my adult life to protect the right to choose.

However, women's reproductive rights are rapidly eroding. And anti-choice advocates make no secret that their ultimate goal is to overturn Roe v. Wade. With just a one-vote margin protecting Roe in the Supreme Court, we cannot afford to take these fundamental rights for granted. The threats we face to our right to choose are real and dangerous.

That is why I am introducing new Federal legislation that will protect a woman's right to choose. The Freedom of Choice Act of 2004 would establish a statutory right to choose within the same parameters articulated by the Supreme Court in Roe v. Wade. Under the bill, women would have the absolute right to choose whether to continue or terminate their pregnancies before fetal viability. The bill also supersedes any law, regulation or local ordinance that impinges on a woman's right to choose and prohibits federal and state governments from discriminating against women, who exercise their right to choose.

That means a poor woman cannot be denied the use of Medicaid if she chooses to have an abortion. That means that abortions cannot be prohibited at public hospitals, thus giving women more options. That means that we respect a woman's ability to make her own decision and don't force women to attend anti-choice propaganda lectures, which submit women to misleading information, the purpose of which is to discourage abortion. That means that women serving our country in the military overseas would be able to afford safe abortions that can be performed in a military hospital.

We need to take steps to secure our right to choose. Anti-choice is anti-woman and anti-equality, and it demonstrates a lack of respect for the intelligence and compassion that women possess.

By Mrs. CLINTON (for herself, Ms. Mikulski, Mrs. Boxer, Ms. Stabenow, Mr. Schumer, Mr. Sarbanes, Mr. Lautenberg, and Mr. Durbin):

S. 2021. A bill to provide for a domestic defense fund to improve the Nation's homeland defense, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Governmental Affairs.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

(a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Domestic Defense Fund Act of 2004''. (b) Table of Contents.--

(a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Domestic Defense Fund Act of 2004''. (b) Table of Contents.--Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.Sec. 2. Findings.Sec. 3. Definitions.Sec. 4. Grants to States, units of general local government, and Indian tribes; authorizations.Sec. 5. Statement of activities and review.Sec. 6. Activities eligible for assistance.Sec. 7. Allocation and distribution of funds.Sec. 8. State and regional planning and communication systems.Sec. 9. High-threat, high-density urban areas.Sec. 10. Flexible emergency assistance fund.Sec. 11. Federal preparedness, equipment, and training standards.Sec. 12. Nondiscrimination in programs and activities.Sec. 13. Remedies for noncompliance with requirements.Sec. 14. Reporting requirements.Sec. 15. Consultation by Attorney General.Sec. 16. Interstate agreements or compacts; purposes.Sec. 17. Matching requirements; suspension of requirements for economically distressed areas.

Congress makes the following findings: (1) Since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on our country, communities all across America have been on the front lines in the war against terrorism on United States soil. (2) Since September 11, 2001, communities have been forced to bear a significant portion of the burden that goes along with the war against terrorism, a burden that local governments should not have to bear alone. (3) Our homeland defense will only be as strong as the weakest link at the State and local level. By providing our communities with the resources and tools they need to bolster emergency response efforts and provide for other emergency response initiatives, we will have a better-prepared home front and a stronger America.

(a) Definitions.--As used in this Act, the following definitions shall apply: (1) City.--The term ``city'' means-- (A) any unit of general local government that is classified as a municipality by the United States Bureau of the Census; or (B) any other unit of general local government that is a town or township and which, in the determination of the Secretary-- (i) possesses powers and performs functions comparable to those associated with municipalities; (ii) is closely settled; and (iii) does not contain within its boundaries any incorporated place, as defined by the United States Bureau of the Census, that has not entered into cooperation agreements with such town or township to undertake or to assist in the performance of homeland security objectives. (2) Federal grant-in-aid program.--The term ``Federal grant-in-aid program'' means a program of Federal financial assistance other than loans and other than the assistance provided by this Act. (3) Indian tribe.--The term ``Indian tribe'' means any Indian tribe, band, group, and nation, including Alaska Indians, Aleuts, and Eskimos, and any Alaskan Native Village, of the United States, which is considered an eligible recipient under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (Public Law 93-638) or was considered an eligible recipient under chapter 67 of title 31, United States Code, prior to the repeal of such chapter. (4) Metropolitan area.--The term ``metropolitan area'' means a standard metropolitan statistical area as established by the Office of Management and Budget. (5) Metropolitan city.-- (A) In general.--The term ``metropolitan city'' means-- (i) a city within a metropolitan area that is the central city of such area, as defined and used by the Office of Management and Budget; or (ii) any other city, within a metropolitan area, which has a population of not less than 50,000. (B) Period of classification.--Any city that was classified as a metropolitan city for at least 2 years pursuant to subparagraph (A) shall remain classified as a metropolitan city. Any unit of general local government that becomes eligible to be classified as a metropolitan city, and was not classified as a metropolitan city in the immediately preceding fiscal year, may, upon submission of written notification to the Secretary, defer its classification as a metropolitan city for all purposes under this Act, if it elects to have its population included in an urban county under subsection (d). (C) Election by a city.--Notwithstanding subparagraph (B), a city may elect not to retain its classification as a metropolitan city. Any unit of general local government that was classified as a metropolitan city in any year, may, upon submission of written notification to the Secretary, relinquish such classification for all purposes under this Act if it elects to have its population included with the population of a county for purposes of qualifying for assistance (for such following fiscal year) under section 5(e) as an urban county. (6) Nonqualifying community.--The term ``nonqualifying community'' means an area that is not a metropolitan city or part of an urban county and does not include Indian tribes. (7) Population.--The term ``population'' means total resident population based on data compiled by the United States Bureau of the Census and referable to the same point or period of time. (8) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. (9) State.--The term ``State'' means any State of the United States, or any instrumentality thereof approved by the Governor; and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands. (10) Unit of general local government.--The term ``unit of general local government'' means any city, county, town, township, parish, village, or other general purpose political subdivision of a State; a combination of such political subdivisions is recognized by the Secretary; and the District of Columbia. (11) Urban county.--The term ``urban county'' means any county within a metropolitan area. (b) Basis and Modification of Definitions.-- (1) Basis.--Where appropriate, the definitions listed in subsection (a) shall be based, with respect to any fiscal year, on the most recent data compiled by the United States Bureau of the Census and the latest published reports of the Office of Management and Budget available 90 days before the beginning of such fiscal year. (2) Modification.--The Secretary may by regulation change or otherwise modify the meaning of the terms defined in subsection (a) in order to reflect any technical change or modification thereof made subsequent to such date by the United States Bureau of the Census or the Office of Management and Budget. (c) Designation of Public Agencies.--The chief executive officer of a State or a unit of general local government may designate 1 or more public agencies, including existing local public agencies, to undertake activities assisted under this Act. (d) Inclusion of Local Governments in Urban County Population.--With respect to program years beginning with the program year for which grants are made available from amounts appropriated for fiscal year 2004 under section 4, the population of any unit of general local government which is included in that of an urban county shall be included in the population of such urban county for 3 program years beginning with the program year in which its population was first so included and shall not otherwise be eligible for a grant as a separate entity, unless the urban county does not receive a grant for any year during such 3-year period. (e) Exclusion of Local Governments From Urban County Population.-- (1) Notification by urban county.--Any county seeking qualification as an urban county, including any urban county seeking to continue such qualification, shall notify each unit of general local government, located within its geographical boundaries and eligible to elect to have its population excluded from that of the urban county, of its opportunity to make such an election. Such notification shall, at a time and in a manner prescribed by the Secretary, be provided so as to provide a reasonable period for response prior to the period for which such qualification is sought. (2) Failure of local government to elect to be excluded.-- The population of any unit of general local government which is provided such notification and which does not inform, at a time and in a manner prescribed by the Secretary, the county of its election to exclude its population from that of the county shall, if the county qualifies as an urban county, be included in the population of such urban county as provided under subsection (d).

(a) Authorization.--The Secretary may award grants to States, units of general local government, and Indian tribes to carry out activities in accordance with this Act. (b) Authorization of Appropriations.-- (1) In general.--There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out section 7-- (A) $4,000,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2005 through 2008; and (B) such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2009 and each fiscal year thereafter. (2) State, regional, and local planning, training, and communication systems.--There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out section 8-- (A) $1,000,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2005 through 2008; and (B) such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2009 and each fiscal year thereafter. (3) High-threat, high-density urban areas.--There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out section 9-- (A) $1,500,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2005 through 2008; and (B) such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2009 and each fiscal year thereafter. (4) Homeland security flexible emergency assistance.--There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out section 10-- (A) $500,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2005 through 2008; and (B) such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2009 and each fiscal year thereafter. (c) Supplement Not Supplant.--Funds appropriated pursuant to the authority of this section shall be used to supplement and not supplant full Federal funding for other first responder programs, including-- (1) the Community Oriented Policing Services Program, as authorized under part Q of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796dd et seq.); (2) the Local Law Enforcement Block Grant Program, as authorized under the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-322) and described in H.R. 728, as passed by the House of Representatives on February 14, 1995; (3) the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Programs, as authorized under part E of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3750 et seq.); and (4) the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, as authorized under section 33 of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 2229).

(a) Application.-- (1) In general.--A State, metropolitan city, urban county, or unit of general local government desiring a grant under subsection (b) or (i) of section 7 shall submit an application to the Secretary that contains-- (A) a statement of homeland security objectives and projected use of grant funds; and (B) the certifications required under paragraph (2) and, if appropriate, subsection (b). (2) Grantee statement.-- (A) Contents.-- (i) Local government.--In the case of metropolitan cities or urban counties receiving grants under section 7(b) and units of general local government receiving grants under section 7(i)(3), the statement of projected use of funds shall consist of proposed homeland security activities. (ii) States.--In the case of States receiving grants under section 7, the statement of projected use of funds shall consist of the method by which the States will distribute funds to units of general local government. (B) Consultation.--In preparing the statement required under this subsection, the grantee shall consult with appropriate law enforcement agencies and emergency response authorities. (C) Final statement.--A copy of the final statement and the certifications required under paragraph (3) and, where appropriate, subsection (b), shall be furnished to the Secretary and the Attorney General. (D) Modifications.--Any final statement of activities may be modified or amended from time to time by the grantee in accordance with the same procedures required under this paragraph for the preparation and submission of such statement. (3) Certification of enumerated criteria by grantee to secretary.--A grant under section 7 shall not be awarded unless the grantee certifies to the satisfaction of the Secretary that the grantee-- (A) has developed a homeland security plan that identifies both short- and long-term homeland security needs that have been developed in accordance with the primary objective and requirements of this Act; and (B) will comply with the other provisions of this Act and with other applicable laws. (b) Submission of Annual Performance Reports, Audits, and Adjustments.-- (1) In general.--Each grantee shall submit to the Secretary, at a time determined by the Secretary, a performance and evaluation report concerning the use of funds made available under section 7, together with an assessment by the grantee of the relationship of such use to the objectives identified in the grantee's statement under subsection (a)(2). (2) Uniform reporting requirements.-- (A) Recommendations by national associations.--The Secretary shall encourage and assist national associations of grantees eligible under section 7, national associations of States, and national associations of units of general local government in nonqualifying areas to develop and recommend to the Secretary, not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, uniform recordkeeping, performance reporting, evaluation reporting, and auditing requirements for such grantees, States, and units of general local government, respectively. (B) Establishment of uniform reporting requirements.--Based on the Secretary's approval of the recommendations submitted pursuant to subparagraph (A), the Secretary shall establish uniform reporting requirements for grantees, States, and units of general local government. (3) Reviews and audits.--Not less than annually, the Secretary shall make such reviews and audits as may be necessary or appropriate to determine-- (A) in the case of grants awarded under section 7(b), whether the grantee-- (i) has carried out its activities; (ii) where applicable, has carried out its activities and its certifications in accordance with the requirements and the primary objectives of this Act and with other applicable laws; and (iii) has a continuing capacity to carry out those activities in a timely manner; and (B) in the case of grants to States made under section 7(i), whether the State-- (i) has distributed funds to units of general local government in a timely manner and in conformance to the method of distribution described in its statement; (ii) has carried out its certifications in compliance with the requirements of this Act and other applicable laws; and (iii) has made such reviews and audits of the units of general local government as may be necessary or appropriate to determine whether they have satisfied the applicable performance criteria described in subparagraph (A). (4) Adjustments.--The Secretary may make appropriate adjustments in the amount of the annual grants in accordance with the Secretary's findings under this subsection. With respect to assistance made available to units of general local government under section 7(i)(3), the Secretary may adjust, reduce, or withdraw such assistance, or take other action as appropriate in accordance with the Secretary's reviews and audits under this subsection, except that funds already expended on eligible activities under this Act shall not be recaptured or deducted from future assistance to such units of general local government. (c) Audits.--Insofar as they relate to funds provided under this Act, the financial transactions of recipients of such funds may be audited by the General Accounting Office under such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Comptroller General of the United States. The representatives of the General Accounting Office shall have access to all books, accounts, records, reports, files, and other papers, things, or property belonging to or in use by such recipients pertaining to such financial transactions and necessary to facilitate the audit. (d) Metropolitan City as Part of Urban County.--In any case in which a metropolitan city is located, in whole or in part, within an urban county, the Secretary may, upon the joint request of such city and county, approve the inclusion of the metropolitan city as part of the urban county for purposes of submitting a statement under subsection (a) and carrying out activities under this Act.

Activities assisted under this Act may include-- (1) funding additional law enforcement, fire, and emergency resources, including covering overtime expenses; (2) purchasing and refurbishing personal protective equipment for fire, police, and emergency personnel and acquire state-of-the-art technology to improve communication and streamline efforts; (3) improving cyber and infrastructure security by improving-- (A) security for water treatment plants, distribution systems, other water infrastructure, nuclear power plants, electrical grids, and other energy infrastructure; (B) security for tunnels, bridges, locks, canals, railway systems, airports, land and water ports, and other transportation infrastructure; (C) security for oil and gas pipelines and storage facilities; (D) security for chemical plants and transportation of hazardous substances; (E) security for agriculture infrastructure; and (F) security for national icons and Federal facilities that may be terrorist targets; (4) assisting local emergency planning committees so that local public agencies can design, review, and improve disaster response systems; (5) assisting communities in coordinating their efforts and sharing information with all relevant agencies involved in responding to terrorist attacks; (6) establishing timely notification systems that enable communities to communicate with each other when a threat emerges; (7) improving communication systems to provide information to the public in a timely manner about the facts of any threat and the precautions the public should take; and (8) devising a homeland security plan, including determining long-term goals and short-term objectives, evaluating the progress of the plan, and carrying out the management, coordination, and monitoring of activities necessary for effective planning implementation.

(a) Set-Aside for Indian Tribes.-- (1) In general.--The Secretary shall reserve 1 percent of the amount appropriated for each fiscal year for grants pursuant to section 4(b)(1) (excluding the amounts for activities described in section 6) for grants to Indian tribes. (2) Selection of indian tribes.-- (A) In general.--The Secretary shall distribute amounts under this paragraph to Indian tribes on the basis of a competition conducted pursuant to specific criteria for the selection of Indian tribes to receive such amounts. (B) Rulemaking.--The Secretary, after notice and public comment, shall promulgate regulations, which establish the criteria described in subparagraph (A). (b) Allocation to Metropolitan Cities and Urban Counties.-- (1) Allocation percentage.--Of the amount remaining after allocations have been made to Indian tribes under subsection (a), the Secretary shall, not later than 60 days after the date on which such funds are appropriated, allocate and directly transfer 70 percent to metropolitan cities and urban counties. (2) Entitlement.--Except as otherwise specifically authorized, each metropolitan city and urban county shall be entitled to an annual grant, to the extent authorized beyond fiscal year 2008, from such allocation in an amount not to exceed its basic amount computed pursuant to subsections (c) and (d). (c) Computation of Amount Allocated to Metropolitan Cities.-- (1) Vulnerability and threat factors.--The Secretary shall calculate the amount to be allocated to each metropolitan city, which shall bear the same ratio to the allocation for all metropolitan cities as the weighted average of-- (A) the population (including tourist, military, and commuting populations) of the metropolitan city divided by the population of all metropolitan cities; (B) the population density of the metropolitan city; (C) the proximity of the metropolitan city to international borders; (D) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to chemical security; (E) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to nuclear security; (F) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains land and water port security; (G) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of energy infrastructure; (H) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of inland waterway infrastructure; (I) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of freight and passenger rail transportation infrastructure; (J) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of aviation infrastructure; (K) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of agriculture infrastructure; (L) the proximity of the metropolitan city to the nearest national icons and Federal facilities that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security, and the proximity of all metropolitan cities to the nearest national icons and Federal buildings that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security; and (M) the threat to the metropolitan city based upon intelligence information from the Department of Homeland Security; (2) Clarification of computation ratios.-- (A) Relative weight of factors.--In determining the weighted average of the ratios under paragraph (1)-- (i) the factor involving population shall constitute 38 percent; (ii) the factor involving population density shall constitute 12 percent; and (iii) the remaining factors shall be equally weighted. (B) Population density.--The metropolitan cities shall be ranked according to the density of their populations in calculating the weighted average of this factor. The population density ratio shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100. (C) Proximity to international borders.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of an international border, the ratio under paragraph (1)(C) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an international border. (D) Vulnerability as it pertains to chemical security.--If a metropolitan city is within the vulnerable zone of a worst- case chemical release (as specified in the most recent risk management plans filed with the Environmental Protection Agency or another instrument development by the Environmental Protection Agency or the Department of Homeland Security that captures the same information for the same facilities), the ratio under paragraph (1)(D) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are within such a zone, not to exceed 100. (E) Vulnerability as it pertains to nuclear security.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear powerplant, as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ratio under paragraph (1)(E) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear powerplant. (F) Vulnerability as it pertains to port security.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of-- (i) one of the 75 largest United States ports, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, United States Ports Report by All Land Modes; or (ii) one of the 25 largest United States water ports by metric tons and value, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, United States Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics,

(a) Set-Aside for Indian Tribes.-- (1) In general.--The Secretary shall reserve 1 percent of the amount appropriated for each fiscal year for grants pursuant to section 4(b)(1) (excluding the amounts for activities described in section 6) for grants to Indian tribes. (2) Selection of indian tribes.-- (A) In general.--The Secretary shall distribute amounts under this paragraph to Indian tribes on the basis of a competition conducted pursuant to specific criteria for the selection of Indian tribes to receive such amounts. (B) Rulemaking.--The Secretary, after notice and public comment, shall promulgate regulations, which establish the criteria described in subparagraph (A). (b) Allocation to Metropolitan Cities and Urban Counties.-- (1) Allocation percentage.--Of the amount remaining after allocations have been made to Indian tribes under subsection (a), the Secretary shall, not later than 60 days after the date on which such funds are appropriated, allocate and directly transfer 70 percent to metropolitan cities and urban counties. (2) Entitlement.--Except as otherwise specifically authorized, each metropolitan city and urban county shall be entitled to an annual grant, to the extent authorized beyond fiscal year 2008, from such allocation in an amount not to exceed its basic amount computed pursuant to subsections (c) and (d). (c) Computation of Amount Allocated to Metropolitan Cities.-- (1) Vulnerability and threat factors.--The Secretary shall calculate the amount to be allocated to each metropolitan city, which shall bear the same ratio to the allocation for all metropolitan cities as the weighted average of-- (A) the population (including tourist, military, and commuting populations) of the metropolitan city divided by the population of all metropolitan cities; (B) the population density of the metropolitan city; (C) the proximity of the metropolitan city to international borders; (D) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to chemical security; (E) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to nuclear security; (F) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains land and water port security; (G) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of energy infrastructure; (H) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of inland waterway infrastructure; (I) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of freight and passenger rail transportation infrastructure; (J) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of aviation infrastructure; (K) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of agriculture infrastructure; (L) the proximity of the metropolitan city to the nearest national icons and Federal facilities that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security, and the proximity of all metropolitan cities to the nearest national icons and Federal buildings that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security; and (M) the threat to the metropolitan city based upon intelligence information from the Department of Homeland Security; (2) Clarification of computation ratios.-- (A) Relative weight of factors.--In determining the weighted average of the ratios under paragraph (1)-- (i) the factor involving population shall constitute 38 percent; (ii) the factor involving population density shall constitute 12 percent; and (iii) the remaining factors shall be equally weighted. (B) Population density.--The metropolitan cities shall be ranked according to the density of their populations in calculating the weighted average of this factor. The population density ratio shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100. (C) Proximity to international borders.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of an international border, the ratio under paragraph (1)(C) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an international border. (D) Vulnerability as it pertains to chemical security.--If a metropolitan city is within the vulnerable zone of a worst- case chemical release (as specified in the most recent risk management plans filed with the Environmental Protection Agency or another instrument development by the Environmental Protection Agency or the Department of Homeland Security that captures the same information for the same facilities), the ratio under paragraph (1)(D) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are within such a zone, not to exceed 100. (E) Vulnerability as it pertains to nuclear security.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear powerplant, as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ratio under paragraph (1)(E) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear powerplant. (F) Vulnerability as it pertains to port security.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of-- (i) one of the 75 largest United States ports, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, United States Ports Report by All Land Modes; or (ii) one of the 25 largest United States water ports by metric tons and value, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, United States Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics, the ratio under paragraph (1)(F) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of a United States land or water port, not to exceed 100. (G) Vulnerability as it pertains to energy infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, non-nuclear power generating plants, compressors, and other significant components of critical energy infrastructure as identified by the Department of Energy or the Department of Homeland Security, the ratio under paragraph (1)(G) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical energy infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (H) Vulnerability as it pertains to inland waterway infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, the most significant locks, canals, and other components of critical inland waterway system infrastructure as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(H) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical inland water infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (I) Vulnerability as it pertains to rail transportation infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, the largest railroad hubs and other significant components of critical freight and passenger rail infrastructure, as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(I) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical inland water infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (J) Vulnerability as it pertains to aviation infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, major passenger or cargo airports that are significant components of the Nation's air transportation infrastructure as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(J) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical aviation transportation infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (K) Vulnerability as it pertains to agriculture infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, major feed yards, food processing facilities, and other significant components of the nation's agriculture infrastructure, as defined and determined by the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Homeland Security, the ratio under paragraph (1)(K) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical agriculture infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (L) Proximity to national icons and federal buildings.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, national icons and Federal buildings that the Department of Homeland Security determines are most vulnerable with respect to a terrorist attack, the ratio under paragraph (1)(L) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of such icons or Federal buildings, not to exceed 100. (M) Intelligence.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that have been identified by the Department of Homeland Security as being special alert or heightened alert status for the longest periods of time, the ratio under paragraph (1)(M) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that have been identified by the Department of Homeland Security, not to exceed 100. (d) Computation of Amount Allocated to Urban Counties.-- (1) Vulnerability and threat factors.--The Secretary shall determine the amount to be allocated to each urban county, which shall bear the same ratio to the allocation for all urban counties as the weighted average of-- (A) the population (including tourist, military, and commuting populations) of the urban county divided by the population of all urban counties; (B) the population density of the urban county; (C) the proximity of the urban county to international borders; (D) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to chemical security; (E) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to nuclear security; (F) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains land and water port security; (G) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of energy infrastructure; (H) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of inland waterway infrastructure; (I) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of freight and passenger rail transportation infrastructure; (J) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of aviation infrastructure; (K) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of agriculture infrastructure; (L) the proximity of the urban county to the nearest national icons and Federal facilities that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security, and the proximity of all urban counties to the nearest national icons and Federal buildings that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security; and (M) the threat to the urban county based upon intelligence information from the Department of Homeland Security; (2) Clarification of computation ratios.-- (A) Relative weight of factors.--In determining the weighted average of the ratios under paragraph (1)-- (i) the factor involving population shall constitute 38 percent; (ii) the factor involving population density shall constitute 12 percent; and (iii) the remaining factors shall be equally weighted. (B) Population density.--The population density ratio shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties, not to exceed 100. The urban counties shall be ranked according to the density of their populations in calculating the weighted average of this factor. (C) Proximity to international borders.--If an urban county is located within 50 miles of an international border, the ratio under paragraph (1)(C) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an international border. (D) Vulnerability as it pertains to chemical security.--If an urban county is within the vulnerable zone of a worst-case chemical release (as specified in the most recent risk management plans filed with the Environmental Protection Agency or another instrument development by the Environmental Protection Agency or the Department of Homeland Security that captures the same information for the same facilities), the ratio under paragraph (1)(D) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are within such a zone, not to exceed 100. (E) Vulnerability as it pertains to nuclear security.--If an urban county is located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear power plant, as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ratio under paragraph (1)(E) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear power plant. (F) Vulnerability as it pertains to port security.--If an urban county is located within 50 miles of-- (i) one of the 75 largest United States ports, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, United States Ports Report by All Land Modes; or (ii) one of the 25 largest United States water ports by metric tons and value, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, United States Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics,

(a) Set-Aside for Indian Tribes.-- (1) In general.--The Secretary shall reserve 1 percent of the amount appropriated for each fiscal year for grants pursuant to section 4(b)(1) (excluding the amounts for activities described in section 6) for grants to Indian tribes. (2) Selection of indian tribes.-- (A) In general.--The Secretary shall distribute amounts under this paragraph to Indian tribes on the basis of a competition conducted pursuant to specific criteria for the selection of Indian tribes to receive such amounts. (B) Rulemaking.--The Secretary, after notice and public comment, shall promulgate regulations, which establish the criteria described in subparagraph (A). (b) Allocation to Metropolitan Cities and Urban Counties.-- (1) Allocation percentage.--Of the amount remaining after allocations have been made to Indian tribes under subsection (a), the Secretary shall, not later than 60 days after the date on which such funds are appropriated, allocate and directly transfer 70 percent to metropolitan cities and urban counties. (2) Entitlement.--Except as otherwise specifically authorized, each metropolitan city and urban county shall be entitled to an annual grant, to the extent authorized beyond fiscal year 2008, from such allocation in an amount not to exceed its basic amount computed pursuant to subsections (c) and (d). (c) Computation of Amount Allocated to Metropolitan Cities.-- (1) Vulnerability and threat factors.--The Secretary shall calculate the amount to be allocated to each metropolitan city, which shall bear the same ratio to the allocation for all metropolitan cities as the weighted average of-- (A) the population (including tourist, military, and commuting populations) of the metropolitan city divided by the population of all metropolitan cities; (B) the population density of the metropolitan city; (C) the proximity of the metropolitan city to international borders; (D) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to chemical security; (E) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to nuclear security; (F) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains land and water port security; (G) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of energy infrastructure; (H) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of inland waterway infrastructure; (I) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of freight and passenger rail transportation infrastructure; (J) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of aviation infrastructure; (K) the vulnerability of the metropolitan city as it pertains to the security of agriculture infrastructure; (L) the proximity of the metropolitan city to the nearest national icons and Federal facilities that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security, and the proximity of all metropolitan cities to the nearest national icons and Federal buildings that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security; and (M) the threat to the metropolitan city based upon intelligence information from the Department of Homeland Security; (2) Clarification of computation ratios.-- (A) Relative weight of factors.--In determining the weighted average of the ratios under paragraph (1)-- (i) the factor involving population shall constitute 38 percent; (ii) the factor involving population density shall constitute 12 percent; and (iii) the remaining factors shall be equally weighted. (B) Population density.--The metropolitan cities shall be ranked according to the density of their populations in calculating the weighted average of this factor. The population density ratio shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100. (C) Proximity to international borders.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of an international border, the ratio under paragraph (1)(C) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an international border. (D) Vulnerability as it pertains to chemical security.--If a metropolitan city is within the vulnerable zone of a worst- case chemical release (as specified in the most recent risk management plans filed with the Environmental Protection Agency or another instrument development by the Environmental Protection Agency or the Department of Homeland Security that captures the same information for the same facilities), the ratio under paragraph (1)(D) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are within such a zone, not to exceed 100. (E) Vulnerability as it pertains to nuclear security.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear powerplant, as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ratio under paragraph (1)(E) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear powerplant. (F) Vulnerability as it pertains to port security.--If a metropolitan city is located within 50 miles of-- (i) one of the 75 largest United States ports, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, United States Ports Report by All Land Modes; or (ii) one of the 25 largest United States water ports by metric tons and value, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, United States Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics, the ratio under paragraph (1)(F) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of a United States land or water port, not to exceed 100. (G) Vulnerability as it pertains to energy infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, non-nuclear power generating plants, compressors, and other significant components of critical energy infrastructure as identified by the Department of Energy or the Department of Homeland Security, the ratio under paragraph (1)(G) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical energy infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (H) Vulnerability as it pertains to inland waterway infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, the most significant locks, canals, and other components of critical inland waterway system infrastructure as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(H) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical inland water infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (I) Vulnerability as it pertains to rail transportation infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, the largest railroad hubs and other significant components of critical freight and passenger rail infrastructure, as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(I) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical inland water infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (J) Vulnerability as it pertains to aviation infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, major passenger or cargo airports that are significant components of the Nation's air transportation infrastructure as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(J) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical aviation transportation infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (K) Vulnerability as it pertains to agriculture infrastructure security.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, major feed yards, food processing facilities, and other significant components of the nation's agriculture infrastructure, as defined and determined by the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Homeland Security, the ratio under paragraph (1)(K) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of critical agriculture infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (L) Proximity to national icons and federal buildings.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, national icons and Federal buildings that the Department of Homeland Security determines are most vulnerable with respect to a terrorist attack, the ratio under paragraph (1)(L) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that are located within 50 miles of such icons or Federal buildings, not to exceed 100. (M) Intelligence.--If a metropolitan city is among the 100 metropolitan cities that have been identified by the Department of Homeland Security as being special alert or heightened alert status for the longest periods of time, the ratio under paragraph (1)(M) shall be 1 divided by the total number of metropolitan cities that have been identified by the Department of Homeland Security, not to exceed 100. (d) Computation of Amount Allocated to Urban Counties.-- (1) Vulnerability and threat factors.--The Secretary shall determine the amount to be allocated to each urban county, which shall bear the same ratio to the allocation for all urban counties as the weighted average of-- (A) the population (including tourist, military, and commuting populations) of the urban county divided by the population of all urban counties; (B) the population density of the urban county; (C) the proximity of the urban county to international borders; (D) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to chemical security; (E) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to nuclear security; (F) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains land and water port security; (G) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of energy infrastructure; (H) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of inland waterway infrastructure; (I) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of freight and passenger rail transportation infrastructure; (J) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of aviation infrastructure; (K) the vulnerability of the urban county as it pertains to the security of agriculture infrastructure; (L) the proximity of the urban county to the nearest national icons and Federal facilities that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security, and the proximity of all urban counties to the nearest national icons and Federal buildings that may be a terrorist target, as determined by the Department of Homeland Security; and (M) the threat to the urban county based upon intelligence information from the Department of Homeland Security; (2) Clarification of computation ratios.-- (A) Relative weight of factors.--In determining the weighted average of the ratios under paragraph (1)-- (i) the factor involving population shall constitute 38 percent; (ii) the factor involving population density shall constitute 12 percent; and (iii) the remaining factors shall be equally weighted. (B) Population density.--The population density ratio shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties, not to exceed 100. The urban counties shall be ranked according to the density of their populations in calculating the weighted average of this factor. (C) Proximity to international borders.--If an urban county is located within 50 miles of an international border, the ratio under paragraph (1)(C) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an international border. (D) Vulnerability as it pertains to chemical security.--If an urban county is within the vulnerable zone of a worst-case chemical release (as specified in the most recent risk management plans filed with the Environmental Protection Agency or another instrument development by the Environmental Protection Agency or the Department of Homeland Security that captures the same information for the same facilities), the ratio under paragraph (1)(D) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are within such a zone, not to exceed 100. (E) Vulnerability as it pertains to nuclear security.--If an urban county is located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear power plant, as identified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ratio under paragraph (1)(E) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties, not to exceed 100, which are located within 50 miles of an operating nuclear power plant. (F) Vulnerability as it pertains to port security.--If an urban county is located within 50 miles of-- (i) one of the 75 largest United States ports, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, United States Ports Report by All Land Modes; or (ii) one of the 25 largest United States water ports by metric tons and value, as stated by the Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration, United States Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics, the ratio under paragraph (1)(F) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are located within 50 miles of a United States land or water port, not to exceed 100. (G) Vulnerability as it pertains to energy infrastructure security.--If an urban county is among the 100 urban counties that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, non-nuclear power generating plants, compressors, and other significant components of critical energy infrastructure as identified by the Department of Energy or the Department of Homeland Security, the ratio under paragraph (1)(G) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are located within 50 miles of critical energy infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (H) Vulnerability as it pertains to inland waterway infrastructure security.--If an urban county is among the 100 urban counties that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, the most significant locks, canals, and other components of critical inland waterway system infrastructure as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(H) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are located within 50 miles of critical inland water infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (I) Vulnerability as it pertains to rail transportation infrastructure security.--If an urban county is among the 100 urban counties that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, the largest railroad hubs and other significant components of critical freight and passenger rail infrastructure, as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(I) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are located within 50 miles of critical inland water infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (J) Vulnerability as it pertains to aviation infrastructure security.--If an urban county is among the 100 urban counties that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, major passenger or cargo airports that are significant components of the Nation's air transportation infrastructure as identified by the Department of Transportation, the ratio under paragraph (1)(J) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are located within 50 miles of critical aviation transportation infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (K) Vulnerability as it pertains to agriculture infrastructure security.--If urban county is among the 100 urban counties that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, major feed yards, food processing facilities, and other significant components of the Nation's agriculture infrastructure, as defined and determined by the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Homeland Security, the ratio under paragraph (1)(K) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are located within 50 miles of critical agriculture infrastructure, not to exceed 100. (L) Proximity to national icons and federal buildings.--If an urban county is among the 100 urban counties that are closest to, or within 50 miles of, national icons and Federal buildings that the Department of Homeland Security determines are most vulnerable with respect to a terrorist attack, the ratio under paragraph (1)(L) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that are located within 50 miles of such icons or Federal buildings, not to exceed 100. (M) Intelligence.--If an urban county is among the 100 urban counties that have been identified by the Department of Homeland Security as being special alert or heightened alert status for the longest periods of time, the ratio under paragraph (1)(M) shall be 1 divided by the total number of urban counties that have been identified by the Department of Homeland Security, not to exceed 100. (e) Exclusions.-- (1) In general.--In computing amounts or exclusions under subsection (d) with respect to any urban county, units of general local government located in the county that are not included in the population of the county in determining the eligibility of the county to receive a grant under this subsection shall be excluded, except that any independent city (as defined by the Bureau of the Census) shall be included if it-- (A) is not part of any county; (B) is not eligible for a grant; (C) is contiguous to the urban county; (D) has entered into cooperation agreements with the urban county which provide that the urban county is to undertake or to assist in the undertaking of essential community development and housing assistance activities with respect to such independent city; and (E) is not included as a part of any other unit of general local government for purposes of this section. (2) Independent cities.--Any independent city that is included in any fiscal year for purposes of computing amounts pursuant to the preceding sentence shall not be eligible to receive assistance under subsection (i) for that fiscal year. (f) Inclusions.-- (1) Local government straddling county line.--In computing amounts under subsection (d) with respect to any urban county, there shall be included all of the area of any unit of local government which is part of, but is not located entirely within the boundaries of, such urban county if-- (A) the part of such unit of local government that is within the boundaries of such urban county would otherwise be included in computing the amount for such urban county under this section; and (B) the part of such unit of local government that is not within the boundaries of such urban county is not included as a part of any other unit of local government for the purpose of this section. (2) Use of grant funds outside urban county.--Any amount received under this section by an urban county described under paragraph (1) may be used with respect to the part of such unit of local government that is outside the boundaries of such urban county. (g) Population.-- (1) Effect of consolidation.--Where data are available, the amount to be allocated to a metropolitan city that has been formed by the consolidation of 1 or more metropolitan cities within an urban county shall be equal to the sum of the amounts that would have been allocated to the urban county or cities and the balance of the consolidated government, if such consolidation had not occurred. (2) Limitation.--Paragraph (1) shall apply only to a consolidation that-- (A) included all metropolitan cities that received grants under this section for the fiscal year preceding such consolidation and that were located within the urban county; (B) included the entire urban county that received a grant under this section for the fiscal year preceding such consolidation; and (C) took place on or after January 1, 2004. (3) Growth rate.--The population growth rate of all metropolitan cities defined in section 3(a)(6) shall be based on the population of-- (A) metropolitan cities other than consolidated governments the grant for which is determined under this paragraph; and (B) cities that were metropolitan cities before their incorporation into consolidated governments. (4) Entitlement share.--For purposes of calculating the entitlement share for the balance of the consolidated government under this subsection, the entire balance shall be considered to have been an urban county. (h) Reallocation.-- (1) In general.--Except as provided under paragraph (2), any amounts allocated to a metropolitan city or an urban county under this section that are not received by the city or county for a fiscal year because of failure to meet the requirements of subsection (a) or (b) of section 5, or that otherwise became available, shall be reallocated in the succeeding fiscal year to the other metropolitan cities and urban counties in the same metropolitan area that certify to the satisfaction of the Secretary that they would be adversely affected by the loss of such amounts from the metropolitan area. (2) Ratio.--The amount of the share of funds reallocated under this subsection for any metropolitan city or urban county shall bear the same ratio to the total of such reallocated funds in the metropolitan area as the amount of funds awarded to the city or county for the fiscal year in which the reallocated funds become available bears to the total amount of funds awarded to all metropolitan cities and urban counties in the same metropolitan area for that fiscal year. (3) Transfer.--Notwithstanding paragraphs (1) and (2), the Secretary may, upon request, transfer to any metropolitan city the responsibility for the administration of any amounts received, but not obligated, by the urban county in which such city is located if-- (A) such city was an included unit of general local government in such county prior to the qualification of such city as a metropolitan city; (B) such amounts were designated and received by such county for use in such city prior to the qualification of such city as a metropolitan city; and (C) such city and county agree to such transfer of responsibility for the administration of such amounts. (i) Allocation to States on Behalf of Non-qualifying Communities.-- (1) In general.--Of the amount appropriated pursuant to section 4 that remains after allocations under subsections (a) and (b), the Secretary shall allocate 30 percent among the States for use in nonqualifying communities. (2) Allocation ratio.-- (A) Population-based.--The allocation for each State shall be based on the population of that State, relative to the populations of all States, excluding the population of qualifying communities. (B) Pro-rata reduction.--The Secretary shall make a pro rata reduction of each amount allocated to the nonqualifying communities in each State under subparagraph (A) so that the nonqualifying communities in each State will receive the same percentage of the total amount available under this subsection as the percentage that such communities would have received if the total amount available had equaled the total amount allocated under subparagraph (A). (3) Distribution.-- (A) States.--A State shall distribute amounts it receives under this subsection to units of general local government located in nonqualifying areas of the State in such manner and at such time as the Secretary shall prescribe, consistent with the statement submitted under section 5(a), and not later than 45 days after the date on which the State receives such amounts from the Federal Government. (B) Certification.--Before a State may receive or distribute amounts allocated under this subsection, the State must certify that-- (i) with respect to units of general local government in nonqualifying areas, the State--

(a) Allocations.--From the amounts appropriated pursuant to section 4(b)(2), the Secretary shall allocate $1,000,000,000 to States, regional cooperations, and units of general local government for-- (1) homeland defense planning within the States; (2) providing increased security through additional first responder personnel; (3) purchasing and refurbishing personal protective equipment for first responder personnel; (4) homeland defense planning within the regions; (5) the development and maintenance of Statewide training facilities and homeland security best-practices clearinghouses; and (6) the development and maintenance of communications systems that can be used between and among first responders, including law enforcement, fire, and emergency medical personnel. (b) Use of Funds.--Of the amount allocated under subsection (a)-- (1) $500,000,000 shall be used by the States for homeland defense planning and coordination within each State; (2) $50,000,000 shall be used by regional cooperations and regional, multistate, or intrastate authorities for homeland defense planning and coordination within each region; (3) $50,000,000 shall be used by the States to develop and maintain statewide training facilities and best-practices clearinghouses; and (4) $400,000,000 shall be used by the States and units of general local government to develop and maintain communications systems that can be used between and among first responders at the State and local level, including law enforcement, fire, and emergency personnel. (c) Allocations to States.-- (1) In general.--Amounts allocated to States under this section shall be allocated among the States based upon the population for each State relative to the populations of all States. (2) Minimum amount provision.--The provision under section 7(i)(4) relating to a minimum amount shall apply to amounts allocated to States under this section. (3) Local communications systems.-- (A) In general.--Not less than 50 percent of the amounts allocated under subsection (b)(4) shall be used for the development and maintenance of local communications systems. (B) Distribution of funds.--Each State shall distribute amounts reserved for local communications systems in that State under subparagraph (A) to units of general local government not later than 45 days after the State receives such amounts from the Federal Government. (d) Allocations to Regional Cooperations.--Funds allocated under subsection (b)(2) shall be allocated to regional cooperations and regional, multistate, or intrastate authorities, based upon the population of the areas covered by each regional cooperative.

(a) Allocations.-- (1) In general.--From the amounts appropriated pursuant to section 4(b)(3), the Secretary shall allocate $1,500,000,000 for discretionary grants to high-threat, high-density urban areas, as determined by the Secretary, and for the protection of critical infrastructure. (2) Distribution.--Grant funds awarded under this section shall be transferred directly to high-threat, high-density urban areas not later than 60 days after the date on which funds are appropriated pursuant to section 4(b)(3). (b) Selection Criteria.--In selecting grantees under this section, the Secretary shall consider-- (1) credible threat; (2) vulnerability; (3) the presence of critical infrastructure, including infrastructure described in section 7; (4) population; (5) population density; and (6) identified needs of public agencies. (c) Homeland Security Plan.--Each high-threat, high-density urban area awarded a grant under this section shall submit a homeland security plan to the State in which it is located and to the Secretary that describes the intended use of grant funds received under this section. (d) Minimum Amount.--Section 1014(c)(3) of the USA PATRIOT ACT (42 U.S.C. 3711(c)(3)) and section 7(i)(4) of this Act shall not apply to funds awarded under this section.

(a) In General.--From the amounts appropriated pursuant to section 4(b)(4), $500,000,000 shall be used to create a flexible emergency assistance fund, from which the Secretary shall provide funds directly to State and units of local government that incur extraordinary homeland security costs. (b) Release of Funds.--The Secretary may release emergency assistance funds to a State or local community as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, including-- (1) when the Secretary determines that a State or local community may be the specific target of a terrorist threat; (2) when a local community is the venue of a high profile trial related to homeland security or terrorism; (3) when the State or local community has been asked to assist in a Federal investigation concerning homeland security or terrorism; and (4) when an agency of the Federal Government has requested the State or local community to assist that agency in performing homeland security functions. (c) Reimbursements.--The Secretary may disburse flexible emergency assistance funds to reimburse States and units of general local government for increased personnel costs associated with the activation of first responders who serve in the Reserves or National Guard. (d) Minimum Amount.--Section 1014(c)(3) of the USA PATRIOT ACT (42 U.S.C. 3711(c)(3)) and section 7(i)(4) of this Act shall not apply to funds awarded under this section.

(a) In General.--The Department of Homeland Security shall develop national homeland security preparedness, first responder training, and equipment standards, and best practices to facilitate the most effective and efficient use of funds authorized under this Act. (b) Consultation.--Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall develop the standards described in subsection (a) in consultation with first responders, States, local communities, nongovernmental homeland security experts, and such other persons and organizations as the Secretary determines to be appropriate. (c) Reports.--The Secretary shall submit a report to Congress on the progress made in developing the standards and best practices described in subsection (a)-- (1) not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act; and (2) not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

(a) In General.--No person in the United States shall on the ground of race, color, national origin, religion, or sex be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity funded in whole or in part with funds made available under this Act. (b) Age or Handicap.--Any prohibition against discrimination on the basis of age under the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101 et seq.) or with respect to an otherwise qualified handicapped individual as provided in section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794) shall also apply to any such program or activity.

If the Secretary finds, after reasonable notice and opportunity for a hearing, that a recipient of assistance under this Act has failed to comply substantially with any provision of this Act, the Secretary shall-- (1) terminate payments to the recipient under this Act; (2) reduce payments to the recipient under this Act by an amount equal to the amount of such payments which were not expended in accordance with this Act; or (3) limit the availability of payments under this Act to programs, projects, or activities not affected by such failure to comply.

(a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the end of each fiscal year in which assistance is awarded under this Act, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report containing-- (1) a description of the progress made in accomplishing the objectives under this Act; (2) a summary of the use of such funds during the preceding fiscal year; and (3) a description of the activities carried out under section 7. (b) Reports to Secretary.--The Secretary may require recipients of assistance under this Act to submit such reports and other information as may be necessary in order

In carrying out the provisions of this Act including the issuance of regulations, the Secretary shall consult with the Attorney General and other Federal departments and agencies administering Federal grant-in-aid programs.

The consent of Congress is hereby given to any 2 or more States to enter into agreements or compacts, not in conflict with any law of the United States-- (1) for cooperative effort and mutual assistance in support of homeland security planning and programs carried out under this Act as they pertain to interstate areas and to localities within such States; and (2) to establish such agencies, joint or otherwise, that the States consider desirable for making such agreements and compacts effective.

By Mr. DURBIN (for himself and Mr. Fitzgerald) (by request):

S. 2022. A bill to designate the Federal building located at 250 West Cherry Street in Carbondale, IL the ``Senator Paul Simon Federal Building''; to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

Sen. Richard J. Durbin

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Mr. President, recently we lost our colleague Paul Simon, a great public servant and a great friend.

At the age of 19, Paul Simon became the Nation's youngest editor-publisher when he accepted a Lion's Club challenge to save the Troy Tribune in Troy, IL. From that start, he built a chain of 13 newspapers in southern and central Illinois. He also used his post in the newspaper world to expose criminal activities and in 1951, at age 22, he was called as a key witness to testify before the U.S. Senate's Crime Investigating Committee.

Paul Simon served the state of Illinois and the United States for years. He is the only individual to have served in both the Illinois House of Representatives and the Illinois Senate, and the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate. He also served as Lieutenant Governor for Illinois. In addition, he served in the U.S. Army.

Paul Simon highly valued education and the youth of our Nation. In addition to his work in Congress to strengthen public education in America, he started the public affairs reporting program at Sangamon State University, now the University of Illinois at Springfield. He later became the founder and director of the Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, IL, and taught there for more than 6 years. In addition, Paul Simon wrote over 20 books and earned over 50 honorary degrees.

From journalism to government to education, Paul Simon set the standard for honesty and caring in public life. He was an unapologetic champion of the less fortunate. He was genuine in his politics, life and values.

Now those of us who loved and respected him will do our best to carry on his tradition. We will find many ways, great and small, to honor him.

Today, I am introducing companion legislation to a bill Congressman Jerry Costello has introduced in the House. This bill would designate the federal building at 250 West Cherry Street in Carbondale, IL, as the ``Senator Paul Simon Federal Building.'' I am happy to have Senator Fitzgerald as a cosponsor of this legislation.

Paul Simon moved to Carbondale in 1974, where he was elected to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. He continued to call the Carbondale area his home until his death. Naming this building in Carbondale after him will help present and future generations remember and honor Paul Simon, a great man who lived in and worked for the people of Carbondale and served our federal government with the greatest integrity. I urge my colleagues to work with Congressman Costello and me to quickly pass this legislation.

I ask unanimous consent that the text of the bill be printed in the Record.

There being no objection, the bill was ordered to be printed in the Record, as follows:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

The Federal building located at 250 West Cherry Street in Carbondale, Illinois shall be known and designated as the ``Senator Paul Simon Federal Building''.

By Mrs. BOXER (for herself and Mr. Lautenberg):

S. 2023. A bill to limit Department of Defense contracting with firms under investigation by the inspector General of the Department of Defense; to the Committee on Armed Services.

Sen. Barbara Boxer

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Mr. President, I am introducing legislation, along with my good friend from New Jersey, Senator Lautenberg, to ensure that American taxpayers are given greater protection when the Defense Department seeks to procure property or services. The United States is spending billions of dollars in its military and reconstruction efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and much of this money is going to private companies.

The purpose of this legislation is simple. It would ban companies under investigation for procurement abuse and possible criminal conduct from receiving no-bid defense contracts. By closing a loophole in current law, the Department of Defense would no longer be permitted to enter into contracts, through a process that does not ensure full and open competition, with contractors simultaneously being investigated by the Pentagon's Office of Inspector General. The legislation also provides that if the President chooses to waive the prohibition in the interest of national security, he must notify Congress with a full and public explanation.

While our men and women in the Armed Services are making extraordinary sacrifices for this country, companies under investigation by the Pentagon's Inspector General should be barred from lining their pockets with money from no-bid contracts.