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Paying Tribute To Reverend Waitstill Sharp And Martha Sharp For Their Heroic Efforts To Save Jews During The Holocaust

Rep. Tom Lantos

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Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree to the resolution (H. Res. 52) paying tribute to Reverend Waitstill Sharp and Martha Sharp for their recognition by the Yad Vashem Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority as Righteous Among the Nations for their heroic efforts to save Jews during the Holocaust.

The Clerk read as follows:

Whereas, on June 13, 2006, the Yad Vashem Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority in Israel, an organization dedicated to preserving the memory of Holocaust victims, honored the Reverend Waitstill Sharp, and his wife, Martha Sharp, posthumously as ``Righteous Among the Nations'' for risking their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust; Whereas the Sharps had to leave their 2-year-old daughter and 6-year-old son in the care of family and congregants in Wellesley, Massachusetts, to answer a call from leaders of the American Unitarian Association to go to Czechoslovakia in February 1939 to provide humanitarian assistance for the tens of thousands of refugees crowding into Prague; Whereas Martha Sharp was a social worker trained at the Jane Addams Hull House, a community service organization in Chicago, Illinois, and the Reverend Waitstill Sharp was a Harvard-educated lawyer and a Sunday school teacher who was inspired to become a Unitarian minister; Whereas, after their arrival in Czechoslovakia, the Sharps immediately grasped that they needed not only to help feed refugees, but also to assist Jews and opponents of the Nazi regime escape to safety elsewhere in Europe; Whereas the Sharps refused to leave Prague when, in March 1939, a month after the Sharps' arrival, the Nazis occupied Czechoslovakia, making the Sharps' work more urgent, more complicated, and more dangerous; Whereas the Sharps insisted on continuing their life-saving mission by working out of private residences even after April 1939, when the Nazis ransacked the office of the Unitarian mission in Prague and threw the furniture into the street; Whereas the Sharps repeatedly risked their own safety to exit and re-enter Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia, crisscrossed Europe to obtain the travel documents necessary to help Jews and opponents of the Nazi regime escape Czechoslovakia, and even escorted some refugees by train through Germany to the United Kingdom; Whereas the Sharps were determined to complete their 6- month mission, even after warnings that the Gestapo was searching for them; Whereas the Sharps stayed in Czechoslovakia until August 30, 1939, 1 day before Gestapo agents came to arrest Martha Sharp, who had become known for her boldness at evading Nazi rules restricting travel; Whereas, upon the Sharps' return in 1940 to their family and the Wellesley Hills Unitarian Church in Massachusetts, their report to the American Unitarian Association about the imminent danger posed by the Nazis to refugees across Europe led to the Sharps being asked to establish a similar operation in France under the newly founded Unitarian Service Committee; Whereas the Sharps returned to Europe in 1940 fully aware of the Nazi terror they would face; Whereas the Sharps had a special interest in saving refugee children, as well as artists, intellectuals, and political dissidents, and the Sharps and the Unitarian colleagues who followed in their footsteps set up systems and escape routes that functioned throughout World War II to assist approximately 2,000 men, women, and children to gain freedom; Whereas the famous Jewish novelist, Lion Feuchtwanger, who was one of the first Germans to have his citizenship revoked after Hitler came to power and whose name topped the Gestapo's ``Surrender on Demand'' list, was one of the first people the Sharps helped in a dramatic and dangerous escape from France; Whereas Eva Rosemarie Feigl, who was 14 in December 1940 when Martha Sharp helped her and 28 other children reach safety in the United States, provided eye-witness testimony that enabled the Yad Vashem Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority in Jerusalem, Israel, to honor the Sharps as ``Righteous Among the Nations''; Whereas, when the Sharps' plans to set up the first office of the newly formed Unitarian Service Committee in Paris, France, failed as a result of the Nazi occupation of France, the Sharps instead established an operation in neutral Portugal, where throughout World War II Lisbon remained the last hope for refugees seeking safe passage out of Nazi- occupied territory; Whereas the Sharps recognized that they were dependent upon a much larger circle of friends and colleagues who made their heroism possible, such as the people who cared for the Sharps' children, the members of the congregation in Wellesley, Massachusetts, who maintained the Wellesley Hills Unitarian Church in the Sharps' absence, ordinary Unitarians who financed their cause, ministers across the United States who urged their congregations to become sponsors for refugees, and secretaries who volunteered in Europe and the United States to maintain thousands of case files for refugees; Whereas the Sharps' efforts resulted not only in the rescue of thousands of people, but in the creation of what is now known as the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, an institution that multiplied the number of rescues a thousand- fold in the years that followed; Whereas, at the Yad Vashem ceremony that honored the Sharps as ``Righteous Among the Nations'' on June 13, 2006, in Israel, officials specifically recognized the Sharps' courage in going into the heart of Europe when World War II was unfolding and many people were fleeing; Whereas Martha Sharp was the first American woman to be named ``Righteous Among the Nations'', and the Reverend Waitstill Sharp and Martha Sharp were only the second and third individuals named ``Righteous Among the Nations'' who were United States citizens at the time they performed the deeds for which they were honored; Whereas the Sharps' daughter, Martha Sharp Joukowsky, accepted the Yad Vashem honor on behalf of her parents and remarked that they were ``modest and ordinary people, who responded to the suffering and needs around them . . . as they would have expected everyone to do in a similar situation''; Whereas Martha Sharp Joukowsky added that the honor given to her parents is also about ``the unseen efforts of a much wider circle of people who made their work possible'' and that it ``is the kind of network that is needed again today to stop the slow genocide in Darfur''; Whereas Martha Sharp Joukowsky concluded her remarks by saying, ``Let this celebration about my parents stand as a call to action''; Whereas September 9, 2006, marks the second anniversary of the United States Government declaring the violence in Darfur, Sudan, to be genocide; and Whereas the Sharps deserve honor for their example and for helping to found an institution, the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, that today carries on their work in distant corners of the world and asks for the ``Righteous Among the Nations'' to help save Darfur now: Now, therefore, be it Resolved, That the House of Representatives-- (1) recognizes the Reverend Waitstill Sharp and Martha Sharp as genuine American heroes; (2) pays tribute to the Reverend Waitstill Sharp and Martha Sharp for having their names added to the Wall of Rescuers in the permanent exhibition of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on September 14, 2006; (3) commends the organization founded to support the Sharps' work, the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, for its efforts to rescue Jews and opponents of the Nazi regime in Europe from 1939 to 1945 and for carrying on the Sharps' legacy by working to save the lives of the people of Darfur, Sudan, and to protect human rights worldwide; and (4) requests the Clerk of the House of Representatives to transmit an enrolled copy of this resolution to the Joukowsky family of Providence, Rhode Island, the direct descendants of the Reverend Waitstill Sharp and Martha Sharp, and to the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee of Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from California (Mr. Lantos) and the gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. Ros-Lehtinen) each will control 20 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.

Rep. Tom Lantos

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Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the resolution under consideration.

Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from California?

There was no objection.

Rep. Tom Lantos

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Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of this resolution and yield myself such time as I might consume.

Mr. Speaker, I would like first to recognize the outstanding efforts of the sponsor of this important measure, Congressman James McGovern, my good friend from Massachusetts, the distinguished member of the Rules Committee, who represents the area where the Reverend Waitstill Sharp, and his wife, Martha Sharp, who are honored in this resolution, lived.

Recently, the Holocaust Remembrance Authority in Jerusalem honored the Reverend Waitstill Sharp and his wife, Martha, posthumously, as Righteous Among the Nations, for risking their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust.

They are only the second and third Americans to be so honored. Varian Fry, a distinguished American diplomat with whom the Sharps worked, was the first to be so honored.

Mr. Speaker, the Sharps' story is one of courage and caring at vast personal sacrifice. They answered the call from the American Unitarian Association and left their two young children behind to travel to Europe twice to save the lives of Jews who were being persecuted and eventually killed. They spent many months in Czechoslovakia in 1939, returned to the United States for a brief period, and then in 1940 again went back to Europe under the auspices of the newly founded Unitarian Universalist Service Committee to aid more people in escaping the horror of the Nazi regime.

In all, as a result of the efforts of the Reverend and Mrs. Sharp and their Unitarian colleagues, over 2,000 men, women and children were saved from the Nazi death machine.

Mr. Speaker, it is particularly appropriate that this House acknowledge the selfless and courageous actions of the Sharps at this time. In just a few days, on January 27, men and women around the globe will commemorate the Second International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

On November 1, 2005, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution and designated January 27 as an annual International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust. This action was strongly endorsed and supported by my good friend, Kofi Annan, the recently retired Secretary General of the United Nations.

January 27 was chosen as the day for this commemoration each year because January 27 was the date on which the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz was liberated by Allied troops in 1945 in the closing days of the Second World War. Two years ago on the 50th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, along with the chronicler of the Holocaust Elie Wiesel and his wife, my wife Annette and I had the honor to be members of the United States delegation at Auschwitz representing our Nation at the solemn ceremonies marking that historic event with heads of state, diplomats, world leaders, and, most importantly, survivors of the Nazi atrocities.

Mr. Speaker, the U.N. General Assembly resolution adopted 14 months ago urges every country to honor the memory of the victims of the Holocaust and encourages the development of educational programs on Holocaust history as part of our firm resolve to prevent genocides in the future.

When this resolution was adopted, Secretary General Kofi Annan said, and I quote, ``There can be no reversing the unique tragedy of the Holocaust. It must be remembered with shame and horror for as long as human memory continues. Only by remembering can we pay fitting tribute to the victims. Millions of innocent Jews and members of other minorities were murdered in the most barbarous ways imaginable. We must never forget those men, women and children or their agony.''

Mr. Speaker, it is essential that we remember the horror and the reality of the Holocaust. A recent poll taken in the United Kingdom, one of the most advanced countries on the face of this planet, revealed the shocking ignorance of the Holocaust among young children in Britain. The poll reported that 28 percent of 18-to-29-year-olds were not certain that the Holocaust took place. This is both incredible and deeply disturbing. And I fear that the United Kingdom is not the only country where such results could be found.

Even more disturbing are political phenomena like Iranian President Ahmadinejad who claim that the murder of 6 million Jews and others targeted by the Nazis and their collaborators during World War II was fabricated. This same Iranian leader recently convened a so-called ``conference'' in Tehran to bring together other Holocaust deniers.

As the only survivor of the Holocaust ever elected to Congress, I am outraged at attempts to deny what I experienced and witnessed firsthand. The Holocaust, Mr. Speaker, did take place, and 6 million innocent men, women and children were massacred in this horrific genocide.

International Holocaust Remembrance Day is a time for all of us to remember and to honor the victims, but it is also a time to remember those like the Reverend Waitstill and Martha Sharp, recognized as Righteous Among the Nations, who heroically stood up in the face of unspeakable evil and said ``no'' to the horrors of the Nazi genocide. They and the decent people who helped them deserve our gratitude, recognition, and admiration.

The Sharps' remarkable story is a powerful reminder that all of us have a moral obligation to take action to end violence and to prevent and stop genocide, genocide which today is taking place in Darfur. We must educate our young people who do not know the significance of the Holocaust, and we must fight against the revisionist historians and phony leaders like Ahmadinejad. The world must be reminded that the Holocaust in fact did occur, that millions suffered untold agony and died.

Mr. Speaker, recent atrocities like Rwanda and Darfur in Sudan remind us that our pledge ``Never Again'' has not been fulfilled. Let us learn from the Reverend Sharp and his courageous wife to have the fortitude and foresight to act against such evil.

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

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Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Speaker, it is a profound honor to be on this floor following the words of our chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee Mr. Lantos, the loan survivor in Congress of the Holocaust, and I echo all of his sentiments.

I also wish to commend my good friend, the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. McGovern), for offering this resolution.

Although we come to the floor and pass resolutions, and sometimes we don't take the time to read them, I hope that all of my colleagues do read this inspirational story of the Sharp family and the way that they helped so many flee the Nazi atrocities, and I rise today in strong support of Mr. McGovern's resolution.

It recognizes Reverend Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha Sharp as genuine American heroes. Further, it pays tribute to the Reverend Sharp and his wife Martha for having their names added to the Wall of Rescuers in the permanent exhibit of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on September 14 of this year.

It further commends the organization founded to support the Sharps' work, the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, for its role in rescuing Jews and opponents of the Nazi regime in Europe from the years 1939 to 1945, as well as carrying on to this day the legacy of the Sharps by working to save the lives of people in places like Darfur, Sudan, and to protect human rights worldwide.

Furthermore, it requests that a copy of this resolution be provided to the direct descendants of these courageous individuals in remembrance of their valiant efforts.

Mr. Speaker, the Sharp family is an example for all to emulate. They demonstrated unparalleled courage in the face of Nazi aggression by providing relief and humanitarian assistance to Jewish refugees, particularly children, and to establish escape routes that were the difference between life and death for many Jews during the Holocaust. They deserve to be honored and they deserve to be remembered today and always.

Elie Wiesel has said that he decided to devote his life to telling the story of the Holocaust because, in his words, ``Having survived, I owe something to the dead, and anyone who does not remember betrays them again.''

We would be betraying the victims as well as the survivors if we did not also remember and honor those who risked their own lives to save the lives of others. For this reason, I ask my colleagues to render their full support to the resolution before us.

Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Rep. Tom Lantos

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Mr. Speaker, I commend my good friend from Florida for her eloquent and powerful statement.

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to yield such time as he may consume to my dear friend from Massachusetts (Mr. McGovern), the author of this resolution, senior member of our Rules Committee.

Rep. Jim McGovern

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Mr. Speaker, let me begin by thanking the distinguished chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee and the distinguished ranking member of the Foreign Affairs Committee for bringing to the floor today H. Res. 52, legislation that pays tribute to the Reverend Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha, the couple who fought genocide. I also want to express my gratitude to both of my colleagues for their eloquent words in support of this legislation.

Last year on September 14, I was privileged to join the wife of the distinguished chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee, Annette Lantos, at a ceremony held at the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., honoring the Reverend Waitstill and Martha Sharp as they became the second and third Americans to be added to the honor roll of 21,000 Righteous Gentiles and non-Jews whose efforts saved countless lives during the Holocaust. At that ceremony we were joined by family members of the Sharps in honoring the memory of this distinguished husband and wife team.

Mr. Speaker, on that same day The Washington Post wrote an article about the Sharps, calling them ``The Couple Who Fought Genocide'' and I would like to share with my colleagues excerpts from that article:

``As the Nazis marched across Europe in 1939 and 1940, a Unitarian minister from Massachusetts and his wife rushed into the coming Holocaust to save Jews and other refugees, including scores of children. When they set out for Europe in January 1939, Germany had seized the Sudetenland from Czechoslovakia and refugees were flowing across the continent. The American Unitarian Association asked numerous ministers to go to Europe before Waitstill, 37, and his social worker wife, Martha, 33, agreed.

``Prague, Czechoslovakia, was home to one of the world's largest Unitarian congregations, which was helping refugees of all stripes--Jews, trade unionists, political dissenters, and others. The Sharps arrived to lend a hand in February 1939, and 1 month later, the city was occupied by the Nazis.

``On March 15, 1939, the day the Germans took Prague, Martha Sharp guided an anti-Nazi leader to asylum at the British Embassy. A few days later, the Reverend Waitstill Sharp arranged for a member of the Czech Parliament to be smuggled out of a hospital morgue in a body bag. The Nazis soon closed the Sharps' office and threw their furniture into the street, but the couple stayed another 5 months and got out just ahead of the Gestapo.

``On their second foray to Europe, they worked in Marseilles, France, and helped smuggle across the Pyrenees into neutral Portugal. One of their close collaborators was Varian Fry, a 32-year-old New York editor who devoted himself to saving European intellectuals and who was the first U.S. citizen placed by Yad Vashem on its `Righteous Among the Nations' honor roll, which includes Oskar Schindler and Raoul Wallenberg.

``Since the Sharps burned most of their records to keep them out of Nazi hands, no one knows how many lives they actually saved. Their grandson, Artemis Joukowsky, III, of Boston, estimates they helped 3,500 refugees in Prague, though it is unclear how many survived. In Marseilles, they pioneered routes that hundreds used to escape.

``Marianne Scheckler-Feder of Laguna Hills, California, has a fuzzy but enduring memory of Martha Sharp, reinforced by a fading black-and-white photograph taken on a sun-dappled street in the French port of Marseilles.

`` `I remember a figure. She was a very, very elegant lady. Kind of serious and very concerned. You looked up to her. She demanded respect,' Sheckler-Feder said, who is now 79 years old.

``Thousands of refugees from across Europe had flocked to Marseilles in hopes of gaining passage abroad, only to be interned in work camps when France surrendered to Germany in 1940 and the Nazis set up a collaborationist government in Vichy. Sheckler-Feder was 12. She was one of three Jewish sisters, nearly identical triplets, who had fled with their parents from Vienna, a bare step ahead of the Nazis.

``Marseilles was the end of the road, the end of hope, until they met Martha Sharp. She pestered Vichy officials to issue exit visas for 29 children, including nine Jews. With almost as much difficulty, she persuaded our State Department, which was rife with anti-Semitism at that time, to let the children and 10 adults into the United States.

``Sheckler-Feder and her sisters traveled by train to Lisbon and sailed in December 1940 aboard the Excambion, a ship stripped of all furnishings except sleeping bags, blankets, and pillows to accommodate as many passengers as possible. Their parents eventually followed.

``Sheckler-Feder has no doubt that were it not for Martha Sharp, her family would have perished: `What she did for us is outstanding. It will never be forgotten.' ''

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud to have introduced this bill with the esteemed chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee, Congressman Tom Lantos, along with House Members of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, Representatives Cantor, LaTourette, and Waxman, the Members of the House congressional delegations representing Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and other bipartisan co-sponsors.

I want to thank Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the majority leader and the minority leader, John Boehner, for supporting this consideration on the Suspension Calendar.

It is my hope that all of us in this House will not only pay tribute to the memory and legacy of Reverend Waitstill and Martha Sharp but will recognize the example they set. There are many urgent situations confronting our world today where people's lives are in grave danger. Many people in communities even face the threat of genocide, as is the case in Darfur. I hope that we can learn from the Sharps' example that each of us can make a difference, can save the lives of others, and all we have to do is step up and answer the call. It is my hope that the inspiration of the Sharps will compel our government and other civilized governments across this world into taking more proactive and more effective steps to stop the genocide that is now going on in the Sudan.

Mr. Speaker, I urge all my colleagues to pass this resolution. Again, I want to thank my friend Mr. Lantos and my friend Ms. Ros-Lehtinen for their eloquent words of support.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

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Mr. Speaker, again I congratulate Mr. McGovern for authoring this important resolution. And that selfless and giving nature of the American spirit as exemplified by this tremendous family is alive and well with so many people trying to stop the genocide in Darfur and in other dark places of the globe.

Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee

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Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H. Res, 52, which honors Rev. Waitstill Sharp and Martha Sharp for their outstanding heroism during the Holocaust. Although the couple lived safely with their two children in Massachusetts in 1939, both felt a calling to provide aid to those in need overseas. They traveled to Czechoslovakia and began providing food for the refugees fleeing the Nazi regime. However, when they arrived, the Nazis invaded Czechoslovakia and the situation grew more dangerous.

Instead of returning home, they found that they could better serve those in harm's way by helping them escape from the region. Despite the numerous life-risking situations and constant pursuit by the Gestapo, the couple stayed and succeeded in helping over 2,000 people escape danger throughout World War II.

I am pleased that they received official recognition as ``Righteous Among Nations'' last June, in the Yad Vashem ceremony in Israel, for truly their righteous actions are unparalleled, and we are incredibly honored to call them our fellow citizens. The Sharps were some of the first Americans to receive the award, setting an incredible example of righteousness and good will for all who follow them.

In addition, I would like to note the powerful words of their daughter, Martha Sharp Joukowsky, who accepted the award on their behalf. She reminded us that her parents' actions represent ``the unseen efforts of a much wider circle of people who made their work possible'' and that this ``is the kind of network that is needed again today to stop the slow genocide in Darfur.'' Sadly, we must recognize that suffering and oppression does not end with one war or one crisis in our past but continues into our present day. In order to truly pay tribute to the Sharps, we must acknowledge our present condition. So I urge my colleagues, as they remember the Sharps today, to also remember the urgency of the devastating situation in Darfur. I am sure if they were alive today, they would devote all their efforts to save the people there from this modern-day Holocaust.

I urge my colleagues to support H. Res. 52, to honor Reverend and Mrs. Sharp for their heroic rescue efforts during World War II.

Rep. Joe Baca

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Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H. Res. 52, legislation paying tribute to Reverend Waitstill and Martha Sharp, an American couple who left the comfort and safety of their home in Massachusetts to save the lives of Jews in danger of being killed during the Holocaust.

Waitstill Sharp was a Unitarian minister and his wife Martha was a social worker.

In the late 1930s, amid the horrors of the Holocaust and a refugee crisis in Europe, the American Unitarian Association asked numerous ministers to cross the Atlantic and offer assistance. The Sharps agreed, despite the dangers and despite having young children at home whom they would have to leave behind in the care of friends and neighbors and members of their congregation.

In February 1939, the Sharps arrived in Prague, Czechoslovakia, where one of the world's largest Unitarian congregations was assisting Jewish refugees and others who opposed the Nazis, including trade unionists and political dissenters. A month later, the Germans occupied Prague, increasing the urgency of the Sharps' mission but also the risk. They remained in Prague almost six months.

Through their courage, creativity and persistence they were able to lead hundreds of people, likely thousands, to safety.

They again heeded the call to action, returning to Europe in 1940, this time based in Marseilles, France, where they helped smuggle people across the Pyrenees into neutral Portugal. The escape routes that they established enabled hundreds of refugees to survive.

Among those whom the Sharps saved from persecution and slaughter at the hands of the Nazis were many children, including Jewish children who are now elderly, living freely in America, and remember with gratitude the couple who saved their lives almost 70 years ago.

I should note that the Sharps and others who worked to save Jews not only had to worry about the Nazis and the Gestapo, Vichy officials, collaborators and informers but also had to overcome bureaucracy and anti-Semitism even among the U.S. State Department. Historians have documented that inaction, indifferences, failures and even outright hostility by American officials resulted in the tragic death of Jews during the Holocaust.

But today we do not dwell on this; instead we honor the Sharps for persevering despite such obstacles and adversity.

Some of the Sharps' surviving relatives and admirers claim they were merely ordinary people who did what anyone would have done in the face of suffering. While I would like to believe that all people of compassion would come to the aid of people in need, especially when lives are at stake, sadly I know that is not the case. It was not true during the Holocaust, and it is not true today as millions of people in America and around the world suffer poverty, hunger, disease and even genocide and yet still not enough is being done to help them.

The special and extraordinary nature of the Sharps' actions is clear by the rare and high honors they have deservedly received.

In June 2006, the Yad Vashem Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority in Israel honored Reverend Waitstill Sharp and Martha Sharp posthumously as ``Righteous Among the Nations'' for risking their lives to save Jews during the Holocaust.

And in September 2006, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. honored the Sharps.

There were definitely other brave, compassionate people who were inspired by their faith, values or their sense of right and wrong and therefore took steps, both small and large, to help Jews during the Holocaust. Some provided food and shelter, some refused to inform on their neighbors or cooperate with authorities enforcing murderous policies, some actively resisted against the Nazis, and some helped transport Jews to safety. But this was not the norm in Europe during the Holocaust. And we know the tragic, horrific results: over 6 million Jewish men, women and children perished.

So today we acknowledge the Sharps as American heroes, and I would add as heroes of humanity. Martha Sharp is the first American woman--and she and Waitstill are only the second and third Americans--to be added to the honor roll of 21,000 ``righteous'' gentiles, or non-Jews, whose efforts saved countless lives during the Holocaust.

We also commend the Unitarian Universality Service Committee. UUSC was founded to support the Sharps' work and helped rescue Jews and other refugees from Nazi persecution. The organization has continued to do good work in support of human rights all over the world and is actively engaged in efforts to stop the genocide in Darfur, Sudan.

As we honor the Sharps, let us be inspired by their heroic example and let us all commit ourselves to doing what we can--and what we must--to bring an end to human suffering.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

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Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

Rep. Tom Lantos

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Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for time, and I yield back the balance of my time.

The question is on the motion offered by the gentleman from California (Mr. Lantos) that the House suspend the rules and agree to the resolution, H. Res. 52.

The question was taken.

In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds of those voting have responded in the affirmative.

Rep. Tom Lantos

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Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.

The yeas and nays were ordered.

Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX and the Chair's prior announcement, further proceedings on this question will be postponed.