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(At The Request Of Mr. Reid, The Following Statements Were Ordered To Be Printed In The Record.)

Sen. Robert C. Byrd

legislator photo

Mr. President, Sunday is Father's Day. The third Sunday in June is a lovely time of year, and a perfect time for any celebration. This year, it is also the first day of summer--the best day of summer, before the weather is too hot, before bugs mar the beauty of fresh green leaves and weeds threaten to smother the garden, before we are tired of marveling at the smooth green of a freshly mown lawn. On this Sunday, we thank both our heavenly Father and our earthly father for all that is good and strong and vibrantly beautiful in our lives.

Although scientists say that some smells can trigger strong memories, I think that there are certain sounds that many people instantly associate with fathers. The keening whine of a power tool, the droning buzz of a lawn mower on a Saturday morning, the grunt and clank of tools in tight places, the quiet scrape of a razor over a stubbled chin, the slow tread of a tired man coming home in the evening, or even the nighttime chorus of snores--these are the everyday sounds of fathers that provide the quiet sounds during a peaceful childhood. Other father sounds may have occurred less frequently, but still trigger their own quick smiles of recall--the slap of a baseball into a worn glove, perhaps, or the gentle splash of a fishing lure hitting the water, that remind us of pastimes enjoyed together.

On Sunday, fathers will be feted with brunches or barbeques. They may open a few gifts and some funny cards. Mother's Day might warrant more sentimentality, but Father's Day seems to call for a more humorous approach--perhaps so that fathers will not be embarrassed by any teary-eyed show of emotion. It is enough, for many fathers, to get a card at all, and to have all the attention focused on him. Most fathers are not much given to displays of emotion or sentimental speeches.

A father's love is expressed through his presence and the endless labor that he expends to care for his family. His love is expressed through his actions, and all the sounds that accompany them. My own Dad was a quiet man, but he saved his cake from lunch to give to me. He listened attentively to my recitations and my fiddle playing, and he made sure that I had paper and pencils to draw with as a child. Without words, he showed me how much he cared.

An untitled poem by an unknown poet captures the unspoken love that fathers find easier to express:

Mr. President, we can all remember times in our own lives when our fathers let us know that they were proud of us. We remember the words of praise, the thumbs up, the smile or simply his quiet presence at some long ago event. An occasion was important, if our father made the time to be there. This Sunday is our chance to return the favor and make the occasion important for him, by our presence at brunch, or by the grill, or on the phone. He will appreciate the effort, even if he may find it difficult to show just how much it means to him.

Sen. Robert C. Byrd

legislator photo

Mr. President, Sunday is Father's Day. The third Sunday in June is a lovely time of year, and a perfect time for any celebration. This year, it is also the first day of summer--the best day of summer, before the weather is too hot, before bugs mar the beauty of fresh green leaves and weeds threaten to smother the garden, before we are tired of marveling at the smooth green of a freshly mown lawn. On this Sunday, we thank both our heavenly Father and our earthly father for all that is good and strong and vibrantly beautiful in our lives.

Although scientists say that some smells can trigger strong memories, I think that there are certain sounds that many people instantly associate with fathers. The keening whine of a power tool, the droning buzz of a lawn mower on a Saturday morning, the grunt and clank of tools in tight places, the quiet scrape of a razor over a stubbled chin, the slow tread of a tired man coming home in the evening, or even the nighttime chorus of snores--these are the everyday sounds of fathers that provide the quiet sounds during a peaceful childhood. Other father sounds may have occurred less frequently, but still trigger their own quick smiles of recall--the slap of a baseball into a worn glove, perhaps, or the gentle splash of a fishing lure hitting the water, that remind us of pastimes enjoyed together.

On Sunday, fathers will be feted with brunches or barbeques. They may open a few gifts and some funny cards. Mother's Day might warrant more sentimentality, but Father's Day seems to call for a more humorous approach--perhaps so that fathers will not be embarrassed by any teary-eyed show of emotion. It is enough, for many fathers, to get a card at all, and to have all the attention focused on him. Most fathers are not much given to displays of emotion or sentimental speeches.

A father's love is expressed through his presence and the endless labor that he expends to care for his family. His love is expressed through his actions, and all the sounds that accompany them. My own Dad was a quiet man, but he saved his cake from lunch to give to me. He listened attentively to my recitations and my fiddle playing, and he made sure that I had paper and pencils to draw with as a child. Without words, he showed me how much he cared.

An untitled poem by an unknown poet captures the unspoken love that fathers find easier to express:

Mr. President, we can all remember times in our own lives when our fathers let us know that they were proud of us. We remember the words of praise, the thumbs up, the smile or simply his quiet presence at some long ago event. An occasion was important, if our father made the time to be there. This Sunday is our chance to return the favor and make the occasion important for him, by our presence at brunch, or by the grill, or on the phone. He will appreciate the effort, even if he may find it difficult to show just how much it means to him.

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