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Earmark Declaration

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart

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Madam Speaker, I submit the following:

Requesting Member: Representative Mario Diaz-Balart (FL-25)

Bill Number: H.R. 3183

Account: Construction

Name of Requesting Entity: South Florida Water Management District

Address of Requesting Entity: 3301 Gun Club Road, West Palm Beach, FL

Description of Request: I have secured $210,239,000 for the South Florida Everglades Ecosystem restoration, FL: Central and Southern FL (C&SF) Project: Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, FL. This funding will be used for the South Florida Everglades Ecostem Restoration: Six projects which are vital to ongoing Everglades Restoration efforts: Picayune Strand--The project involves the restoration of natural water flows across 85-square miles in western Collier County that were previously cleared for a residential community. The project includes construction of three pump stations with spreader canals, the plugging of 40-miles of canals and the removal of 227-miles of roads. Levees will be installed, as required, to provide flood protection for adjacent private properties that would be impacted by the project. ($56 million) Indian River Lagoon--The project will include a 3,400-acres above-ground reservoir to capture local basin runoff with 6,300-acres of storm water Treatment Areas. The project will decrease the excessive water flows into the St. Lucie Estuary, improve the water quality by treating the water entering the Estuary and provide water supplies for the environmental and human needs of the area. ($75 million) Site 1 Impoundment--This project involves construction of an approximately 1,600-acre impoundment where water will be pumped from the Hillsboro Canal. The project will capture and store the excess surface water runoff from the Hillsboro Watershed as well as releases from the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge and Lake Okeechobee. The project will allow more natural, desirable and consistent water levels within the Refuge as well as benefit estuaries downstream ($27 million) C-111 Spreader Canal--This project is located adjacent to Everglades National Park and is part of the South Dade County portion of the Central and Southern Florida (C&SF). The project goal is to create a hydrologic ridge between Everglades National Park and areas east that are mostly in agricultural production. The project is intended to maintain existing flood protection while restoring natural hydrologic conditions in the eastern panhandle of Everglades National Park ($20 million) C-51 design--The project will provide water quality benefits to the surrounding areas along with Storm water Treatment Area lE ($16 million) CERP design--Includes design project agreements, Project Implementation Reports, detailed project design and RECOVER which are all essential to ongoing Everglades Restoration efforts ($64 million) The funding would be used for six projects which are vital to ongoing efforts to restore the historic South Florida ecosystem including the Florida Everglades. The Florida Everglades are a unique ecosystem that must be preserved for future generations.

Requesting Member: Representative Mario Diaz-Balart (FC-25)

Bill Number: H.R. 3183

Account: Science

Name of Requesting Entity: Florida International University

Address of Requesting Entity: 11200 SW 8th St, Miami, FL 33199

Description of Request: I have secured $1,000,000 for the state-of-the-Art Large-Scale Testing for Wind to Enhance Infrastructure Resiliency and Develop Energy-Efficient Buildings. This funding will be used for a full-scale testing in the WoW facility, supported by the enhanced capabilities, will lead to major improvements in the performance of infrastructure and life-line elements, including electrical utility and power distribution systems, safer nuclear power plants in hurricane-prone regions, and increased community resilience under Category 3 and 4 hurricanes. In addition, by virtue of its unprecedented capabilities to simulate natural, turbulent winds, the FIU full-scale testing facility will test innovative building envelopes capable of massively reducing energy consumption in buildings, reducing GHGs, and improving IEQ. The impact of the facility would be enormous. Losses that may remain inadequately insured because of the excessively large risks they entail could be massively reduced by further developing the requisite scientific knowledge through full-scale experiments conducted in the more powerful and equipt WOW. Thus the requested funding would transform WoW the only facility in the world capable of testing a wide variety of types of structure to promote significant mitigation of the vast losses due to hurricanes and contribute massively to improving energy performance of buildings and reducing GHGs. The new capabilities would be a breakthrough in enabling quick results and affordable solutions, thereby making major scientific advancements beneficial to the State and the Nation. The research activities will significantly enhance the economic and societal well-being of the general population and businesses--thus promoting hurricane resilient sustainable communities. Hurricanes caused more than $100 billion in losses in 2005 alone and caused more than 1,400 fatalities in 2004-05. Infrastructure damage and lifeline disruption are severe problems to hurricane prone coastal communities. In 2004 and 2005, seven hurricanes struck the coast of Florida causing severe damage to electrical infrastructure. A record 3.2 million FPL customers were left without electric service as Hurricane Wilma's (2005) winds damaged street lighting, transformers, transmission lines, and substations. Wind is also a significant factor affecting building energy consumption through air leakage, while wind accompanied by rain can affect indoor environment quality (IEQ). Buildings use about one-third of the world's energy. In the United States today, the buildings sector accounts for 40% of the primary energy use. The use of electric power and heat in the buildings sector also accounts for about 40% of the U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs). Buildings present one of the best opportunities to reduce energy consumption and limit GHGs. Florida International University (FIU) has developed a one-of-a-kind large-scale Wall of Wind (WoW) facility simulating atmospheric turbulent flows and hurricane force winds. Currently the focus of WoW research is mitigation of damage to residential buildings. However, the WoW design allows its use for multiple testing of other infrastructural and life-line elements. Unfortunately such variety of testing is not feasible owing to the lack of the instrumentation for measuring aerodynamic, aeroelastic, and thermal effects. For this reason this large, expensive, and unique facility is severely under-used. The proposed funding would allow such WoW instrumentation to achieve a transformative testing capability not available anywhere else in the world.

Requesting Member: Representative Mario Diaz-Balart (FL-25)

Bill Number: H.R. 3183

Account: EERE-Building Technologies

Name of Requesting Entity: City of Homestead, FL

Address of Requesting Entity: 790 N. Homestead Blvd, Homestead, FL,

Description of Request: I have secured $500,000 for the City Hall Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certification. This funding will be used for the City of Homestead is in the process of replacing its aging and inadequate City Hall building with a new structurally hardened, energy efficient, low carbon emission, and environmentally friendly building. This new building, in addition to housing all City departments, will also encompass Homestead's new Emergency Operations Center. The City has requested that the designers include features in the design that will result in a LEED Silver Certificate. The design is complete and procurement for construction will start by the end of February 2009. The total cost of the City Hall project, which will employ approximately 60 persons, is $30 million of which $1 million is estimated for the improvements needed to meet the requirements for LEED Silver Certification. Without this funding assistance, Homestead's LEED certification efforts may not be fully realized. This project follows Congress' and the Administration's stated goals in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in areas such as: providing immediate job creation, utilization of green construction technologies, and providing energy efficiency cost savings. Designed to Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) silver standards, the new City Hall will serve as a premier example of green construction and energy efficiency technology in the community.

Requesting Member: Representative Mario Diaz-Balart (FL-25)

Bill Number: H.R. 3183

Account: Construction

Name of Requesting Entity: Miami-Dade County, FL

Address of Requesting Entity: 111 NW 1st St., Suite 1032, Miami, FL

Description of Request: I have secured $600,000 for the Miami Harbor Channel Dredging. This funding will be used for the General Reevaluation Report Implementation, Preconstruction, Engineering, and Design for the dredging of Miami Harbor. This funding was authorized via WRDA 2007 (H.R. 1495) for preconstruction, engineering, and design of the recommended project. This will address the federal share at 100% of the anticipated costs for plans and specifications preparation. The Army Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers has recommended the deepening project to 50-52 feet and Congress has authorized the project (Title I, Water Resources Development Act of 2007). It is essential that the Planning, Engineering, and Design (PED) begin as soon as possible. Extended delay in the proposed dredging improvements could be detrimental to the economy of South Florida and the nation. Cargo growth at the Port of Miami has been phenomenally strong. However, the industry standard container ship is becoming larger, and the Port cannot handle the newer ships without deeper channels. In addition, the Port has been facing increasing competition from foreign ports with existing significantly deeper channels and faces the real threat of losing business to foreign ports (such as Freeport). The targeted population includes the ships/commerce currently utilizing the Port of Miami and future business which will be generated as a consequence of larger vessels being able to utilize the Port of Miami. Port of Miami growth will benefit the citizens of Miami-Dade County, South Florida and the nation. Miami Harbor is a major economic force for the County, South Florida and the nation. The Port of Miami is one of the nation's strongest economic engines, accounting for over 98,000 jobs and $12 billion in annual economic impact. It is the State of Florida's top container port and one of the largest in the nation

Requesting Member: Representative Mario Diaz-Balart (FL-25)

Bill Number: H.R. 3183

Account: O&M

Name of Requesting Entity: Miami-Dade County, FL

Address of Requesting Entity: 111 NW 1st St., Suite 1032, Miami, FL

Description of Request: I have secured $777,000 for the Miami River Dredging. This funding will be used for the final phase of the Miami River Dredging Project to restore authorized depth and width to the navigation channel. This project, funded by the US Army Corps of Engineers with a coalition of local sponsors led by Miami-Dade County, removes contaminated sediments from the Miami River, Florida's 4th largest port with an economic value of $4 billion. Since it was improved for navigation in the 1930s, the river has never received comprehensive maintenance dredging. Sediments have accumulated in the federal channel making it narrower and shallower, thereby limiting activities of freighters that utilize ship terminals along the river. The sediments do not meet federal criteria for ocean disposal, so they must be disposed of at an upland site. Dredging and disposal of the contaminated dredged materials improve navigation and enhance the environmental quality of the river and downstream portions of Biscayne Bay, an outstanding Florida water body. Sediments have accumulated in the margins of the federal channel making it narrower and shallower, thereby limiting activities of freighters that utilize ship terminals along the river. Dredging and disposal of the contaminated sediments is expected to improve navigation and enhance the environmental quality of the Miami River and downstream portions of Biscayne Bay. The target population includes those who use the Miami River for navigational purposes. Additionally, the positive environmental effects from the dredging will be beneficial to all of Miami-Dade County's residents. This project benefits the environment of South Florida because it removes contaminated sediment from the Miami River before those contaminates enter the Bay. Completion of the project will also permit larger commercial vessels to call on the River, thus increasing commerce. Completion of the project will also allow the marine related industry to expand along the River. For example, Merrill Stevens, a local boat yard, is planning on adding over 100 new skilled jobs and a training center to teach local people the skills required to work on large ocean going vessels. This project has the support of the Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners, the Mayor of Miami-Dade County, and the Director of the County's Department of Environmental Resources Management.

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