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Coast Guard And Maritime Transportation Act Of 2014

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 4005) to authorize appropriations for the Coast Guard for fiscal years 2015 and 2016, and for other purposes, as amended.

The Clerk read the title of the bill.

The text of the bill is as follows:

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

(a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014''. (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is as follows:Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

Funds are authorized to be appropriated for each of fiscal years 2015 and 2016 for necessary expenses of the Coast Guard as follows: (1) For the operation and maintenance of the Coast Guard-- (A) $6,981,036,000 for fiscal year 2015; and (B) $6,981,036,000 for fiscal year 2016. (2) For the acquisition, construction, rebuilding, and improvement of aids to navigation, shore and offshore facilities, vessels, and aircraft, including equipment related thereto-- (A) $1,546,448,000 for fiscal year 2015; and (B) $1,546,448,000 for fiscal year 2016;

(a) Active Duty Strength.--The Coast Guard is authorized an end-of-year strength for active duty personnel of 43,000 for each of fiscal years 2015 and 2016. (b) Military Training Student Loads.--The Coast Guard is authorized average military training student loads for each of fiscal years 2015 and 2016 as follows: (1) For recruit and special training, 2,500 student years. (2) For flight training, 165 student years. (3) For professional training in military and civilian institutions, 350 student years. (4) For officer acquisition, 1,200 student years.

Section 42(a) of title 14, United States Code, is amended by striking ``7,200'' and inserting ``6,700''.

Section 57 of title 14, United States Code, is amended-- (1) in subsection (b)-- (A) in paragraph (2) by striking ``or'' at the end; (B) in paragraph (3) by striking the period at the end and inserting a semicolon; and (C) by adding at the end the following: ``(4) waterways operations manager shall have knowledge, skill, and practical experience with respect to marine transportation system management; or ``(5) port and facility safety and security specialist shall have knowledge, skill, and practical experience with respect to the safety, security, and environmental protection responsibilities associated with maritime ports and facilities.''; (2) in subsection (c) by striking ``or marine safety engineer'' and inserting ``marine safety engineer, waterways operations manager, or port and facility safety and security specialist''; and (3) in subsection (f)(2) by striking ``investigator or marine safety engineer.'' and inserting ``investigator, marine safety engineer, waterways operations manager, or port and facility safety and security specialist.''.

Section 58(b) of title 14, United States Code, is amended to read as follows: ``(b) Missions.--Any center established under subsection (a) may-- ``(1) promote, facilitate, and conduct-- ``(A) education; ``(B) training; and ``(C) activities authorized under section 93(a)(4); and ``(2) be a repository of information on operations, practices, and resources related to the mission for which the center was established.''.

(a) In General.--Section 93(a)(4) of title 14, United States Code, is amended-- (1) by striking ``, investigate'' and inserting ``and investigate''; and (2) by striking ``, and cooperate and coordinate such activities with other Government agencies and with private agencies''. (b) Authority.--Chapter 5 of title 14, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

(a) Commandant; General Powers.--Section 93(a)(13) of title 14, United States Code, is amended by striking ``the Treasury'' and inserting ``the fund established under section

(a) In General.--Chapter 5 of title 14, United States Code, as amended by this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

Section 194 of title 14, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

Section 494 of title 14, United States Code, is amended by striking ``medal of honor,'' each place that it appears.

(a) In General.--Section 569 of title 14, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

(a) In General.--Title 14, United States Code, as amended by this Act, is further amended by inserting after section 662 the following:

(a) In General.--Chapter 17 of title 14, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

Section 712(a) of title 14, United States Code, is amended by striking ``not more than 60 days in any 4-month period and''.

Section 404(b) of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-281; 124 Stat. 2951) is amended by striking ``2015'' and inserting ``2017''.

(a) Coast Guard Polar Icebreakers.--Section 222 of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2012 (Public Law 112-213; 126 Stat. 1560) is amended-- (1) in subsection (d)(2)-- (A) in the paragraph heading by striking ``; bridging strategy''; and (B) by striking ``Commandant of the Coast Guard'' and all that follows through the period at the end and inserting ``Commandant of the Coast Guard may decommission the Polar Sea.''; (2) by adding at the end of subsection (d) the following: ``(3) Result of no determination.--If in the analysis submitted under this section the Secretary does not make a determination under subsection (a)(5) regarding whether it is cost-effective to reactivate the Polar Sea, then-- ``(A) the Commandant of the Coast Guard may decommission the Polar Sea; or ``(B) the Secretary may make such determination, not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this paragraph, and take actions in accordance with this subsection as though such determination was made in the analysis previously submitted.''; (3) by redesignating subsections (e), (f), and (g) as subsections (f), (g), and (h), respectively; and (4) by inserting after subsection (d) the following: ``(e) Strategies.-- ``(1) In general.--Not later than 180 days after the date on which the analysis required under subsection (a) is submitted, the Commandant of the Coast Guard shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate-- ``(A) a strategy to meet the Coast Guard's Arctic ice operations needs through September 30, 2050; and ``(B) unless the Secretary makes a determination under this section that it is cost-effective to reactivate the Polar Sea, a bridging strategy for maintaining the Coast Guard's polar icebreaking services until at least September 30, 2024. ``(2) Requirement.--The strategies required under paragraph (1) shall include a business case analysis comparing the leasing and purchasing of icebreakers to maintain the needs and services described in that paragraph.''. (b) Limitation.-- (1) In general.--The Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is operating may not expend amounts appropriated for the Coast Guard for any of fiscal years 2015 through 2024, for-- (A) design activities related to a capability of a Polar- Class Icebreaker that is based on an operational requirement of another Federal department or agency, except for amounts appropriated for design activities for a fiscal year before fiscal year 2016; or (B) long-lead-time materials, production, or post-delivery activities related to such a capability. (2) Other amounts.--Amounts made available to the Secretary under an agreement with another Federal department or agency and expended on a capability of a Polar-Class Icebreaker that is based on an operational requirement of that or another Federal department or agency shall not be treated as amounts expended by the Secretary for purposes of the limitation established under paragraph (1).

In fiscal year 2015 and each fiscal year thereafter, the Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is operating may enter into, in accordance with section 2306b of title 10, United States Code, multiyear contracts for the procurement of Offshore Patrol Cutters and associated equipment.

Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is operating shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report that includes-- (1) a schedule and plan for decommissioning, not later than September 30, 2029, each of the 210-foot, Reliance-Class Cutters operated by the Coast Guard on the date of enactment of this Act; (2) a schedule and plan for enhancing the maintenance or extending the service life of each of the 270-foot, Famous- Class Cutters operated by the Coast Guard on the date of enactment of this Act-- (A) to maintain the capability of the Coast Guard to carry out sea-going missions with respect to such Cutters at the level of capability existing on September 30, 2013; and (B) for the period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act and ending on the date on which the final Offshore Patrol Cutter is scheduled and planned to be commissioned under paragraph (4); (3) an identification of the number of Offshore Patrol Cutters capable of sea state 5 operations that, if 8 National Security Cutters are commissioned, are necessary to return the sea state 5 operating capability of the Coast Guard to the level of capability that existed prior to the decommissioning of the first High Endurance Cutter in fiscal year 2011; (4) a schedule and plan for commissioning the number of Offshore Patrol Cutters identified under paragraph (3); and (5) a schedule and plan for commissioning, not later than September 30, 2034, a number of Offshore Patrol Cutters not capable of sea state 5 operations that is equal to-- (A) 25; less (B) the number of Offshore Patrol Cutters identified under paragraph (3).

(a) Elimination of Outdated and Duplicative Reports.-- (1) Marine industry training.--Section 59 of title 14, United States Code, is amended-- (A) by striking ``(a) In General.--The Commandant'' and inserting ``The Commandant''; and (B) by striking subsection (b). (2) Operations and expenditures.--Section 651 of title 14, United States Code, and the item relating to such section in the analysis for chapter 17 of such title, are repealed. (3) Drug interdiction.--Section 103 of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 1996 (14 U.S.C. 89 note), and the item relating to that section in the table of contents in section 2 of that Act, are repealed. (4) National defense.--Section 426 of the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (14 U.S.C. 2 note), and the item relating to that section in the table of contents in section 1(b) of that Act, are repealed. (5) Living marine resources.--Section 4(b) of the Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act of 2010 (16 U.S.C. 1828 note) is amended by adding at the end the following: ``No report shall be required under this subsection, including that no report shall be required under section 224 of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2004 or section 804 of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2006, for fiscal years beginning after fiscal year 2013.''. (b) Consolidation and Reform of Reporting Requirements.-- (1) Marine safety.-- (A) In general.--Section 2116(d)(2)(B) of title 46, United States Code, is amended to read as follows: ``(B) on the program's mission performance in achieving numerical measurable goals established under subsection (b), including-- ``(i) the number of civilian and military Coast Guard personnel assigned to marine safety positions; and ``(ii) an identification of marine safety positions that are understaffed to meet the workload required to accomplish each activity included in the strategy and plans under subsection (a); and''. (B) Conforming amendment.--Section 57 of title 14, United States Code, as amended by this Act, is further amended-- (i) by striking subsection (e); and (ii) by redesignating subsections (f), (g), and (h) as subsections (e), (f), and (g) respectively. (2) Minor construction.--Section 656(d)(2) of title 14, United States Code, is amended to read as follows: ``(2) Report.--Not later than the date on which the President submits to Congress a budget under section 1105 of title 31 each year, the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report describing each project carried out under paragraph (1), in the most recently concluded fiscal year, for which the amount expended under such paragraph for such project was more than $1,000,000. If no such project was carried out during a fiscal year, no report under this paragraph shall be required with respect to that fiscal year.''. (3) Rescue 21.--Section 346 of the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (14 U.S.C. 88 note) is amended to read as follows:

Title 14, United States Code, as amended by this Act, is further amended-- (1) in section 93(b)(1) by striking ``Notwithstanding subsection (a)(14)'' and inserting ``Notwithstanding subsection (a)(13)''; (2) in section 197(b) by striking ``of Homeland Security''; and (3) in section 573(c)(3)(A) by inserting ``and shall maintain such cutter in such class'' before the period at the end.

(a) In General.--Title 14, United States Code, is amended by inserting after section 295 the following:

The Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is operating may-- (1) request and accept through a direct military-to- military transfer under section 2571 of title 10, United States Code, such H-60 helicopters as may be necessary to establish a year-round operational capability in the Coast Guard's Ninth District; and (2) use funds provided under section 101 of this Act to

(a) In General.--The Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is operating may not carry out activities related to the dismantling or disposal of infrastructure that supported the former LORAN system until the later of-- (1) the date that is 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act; or (2) the date on which the Secretary provides to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate notice of a determination by the Secretary that such infrastructure is not required to provide a positioning, navigation, and timing system to provide redundant capability in the event GPS signals are disrupted. (b) Exception.--Subsection (a) does not apply to activities necessary for the safety of human life. (c) Agreements.--The Secretary may enter into cooperative agreements, contracts, and other agreements with Federal entities and other public or private entities, including academic entities, to develop a positioning, timing, and navigation system, including an enhanced LORAN system, to provide redundant capability in the event GPS signals are disrupted.

(a) In General.--Subchapter I of chapter 313 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

(a) In General.--Section 80301 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following: ``(c) Payments.--Payments received pursuant to subsection (b)(1) shall be credited to the appropriation for operating expenses of the Coast Guard. ``(d) Limitation.-- ``(1) In general.--A Coast Guard vessel or aircraft may not be used to carry out an agreement under subsection (a) in fiscal year 2015 and any fiscal year thereafter unless payments are received by the United States Government pursuant to subsection (b)(1) in the preceding fiscal year in a total amount that is not less than difference between-- ``(A) the cost incurred by the Coast Guard in maintaining the services; minus ``(B) the amount of the proportionate share of the expense generated by vessels documented under the laws of the United States. ``(2) Exception.--Notwithstanding paragraph (1), Coast Guard aircraft may be used to carry out an agreement under subsection (a) if the President determines it necessary in the interest of national security. ``(3) Notification.--The President shall notify the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate of a determination made under paragraph (2) within 15 days after such determination.''. (b) Repeal.--Section 80302 of title 46, United States Code, and the item relating to such section in the analysis for chapter 803 of such title, are repealed on October 1, 2014.

Chapter 555 of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (1) by repealing section 55501; (2) by redesignating section 55502 as section 55501; and (3) in the analysis by striking the items relating to sections 55501 and 55502 and inserting the following:``55501. United States Committee on the Marine Transportation System.''.

Section 51103 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following: ``(e) Donation for Historical Purposes.-- ``(1) In general.--The Secretary may convey the right, title, and interest of the United States Government in any property administered by the Maritime Administration, except real estate or vessels, if-- ``(A) the Secretary determines that such property is not needed by the Maritime Administration; and ``(B) the recipient-- ``(i) is a nonprofit organization, a State, or a political subdivision of a State; ``(ii) agrees to hold the Government harmless for any claims arising from exposure to hazardous materials, including asbestos, polychlorinated biphenyls, or lead paint, after conveyance of the property; ``(iii) provides a description and explanation of the intended use of the property to the Secretary for approval; ``(iv) has provided to the Secretary proof, as determined by the Secretary, of resources sufficient to accomplish the intended use provided under clause (iii) and to maintain the property; ``(v) agrees that when the recipient no longer requires the property, the recipient shall-- ``(I) return the property to the Secretary, at the recipient's expense and in the same condition as received except for ordinary wear and tear; or ``(II) subject to the approval of the Secretary, retain, sell, or otherwise dispose of the property in a manner consistent with applicable law; and ``(vi) agree to any additional terms the Secretary considers appropriate. ``(2) Reversion.--The Secretary shall include in any conveyance under this subsection terms under which all right, title, and interest conveyed by the Secretary shall revert to the Government if the Secretary determines the property has been used other than as approved by the Secretary under paragraph (1)(B)(iii).''.

Section 54101(i) of title 46, United States Code, is amended by striking ``2009 through 2013'' and inserting ``2015 and 2016''.

Section 7706 of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (1) in subsection (a), by inserting ``an applicant for employment by a Federal agency,'' after ``Federal agency,''; and (2) in subsection (c), by-- (A) inserting ``or an applicant for employment by a Federal agency'' after ``an employee''; and (B) striking ``the employee.'' and inserting ``the employee or the applicant.''.

Section 30104 of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (1) by inserting ``(a) In General.--'' before the first sentence; and (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection: ``(b) Restriction on Recovery for Nonresident Aliens Employed on Foreign Passenger Vessels.--A claim for damages or expenses relating to personal injury, illness, or death of a seaman who is a citizen of a foreign nation, arising during or from the engagement of the seaman by or for a passenger vessel duly registered under the laws of a foreign nation, may not be brought under the laws of the United States if-- ``(1) such seaman was not a permanent resident alien of the United States at the time the claim arose; ``(2) the injury, illness, or death arose outside the territorial waters of the United States; and ``(3) the seaman or the seaman's personal representative has or had a right to seek compensation for the injury, illness, or death in, or under the laws of-- ``(A) the nation in which the vessel was registered at the time the claim arose; or ``(B) the nation in which the seaman maintained citizenship or residency at the time the claim arose.''.

(a) Foreign and Intercoastal Voyages.--Section 10313(g) of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (1) in paragraph (2)-- (A) by striking ``all claims in a class action suit by seamen'' and inserting ``each claim by a seaman''; and (B) by striking ``the seamen'' and inserting ``the seaman''; and (2) in paragraph (3)-- (A) by striking ``class action''; and (B) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``, by a seaman who is a claimant in the suit,'' and inserting ``by the seaman''. (b) Coastwise Voyages.--Section 10504(c) of such title is amended-- (1) in paragraph (2)-- (A) by striking ``all claims in a class action suit by seamen'' and inserting ``each claim by a seaman''; and (B) by striking ``the seamen'' and inserting ``the seaman''; and (2) in paragraph (3)-- (A) by striking ``class action''; and (B) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``, by a seaman who is

(a) Endorsements for Veterans.--Section 7101 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following: ``(j) The Secretary may issue a license under this section in a class under subsection (c) to an applicant that-- ``(1) has at least 3 months of qualifying service on vessels of the uniformed services (as that term is defined in section 101(a) of title 10) of appropriate tonnage or horsepower within the 7-year period immediately preceding the date of application; and ``(2) satisfies all other requirements for such a license.''. (b) Sea Service Letters.-- (1) In general.--Title 14, United States Code, as amended by this Act, is further amended by inserting after section 427 the following:

(a) In General.--The Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (33 U.S.C. 1901 et seq.) is amended-- (1) by adding at the end the following:

Section 55305(e) of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (1) in paragraph (1)-- (A) by striking ``provide armed personnel aboard'' and inserting ``reimburse, subject to the availability of appropriations, the owners or operators of''; and (B) by inserting ``for the cost of providing armed personnel aboard such vessels'' before ``if''; and (2) by striking paragraphs (2) and (3) and inserting the following: ``(2) In this subsection, the term `high-risk waters' means waters-- ``(A) so designated by the Commandant of the Coast Guard in the maritime security directive issued by the Commandant and in effect on the date on which an applicable voyage begins; and ``(B) in which the Secretary of Transportation determines an act of piracy is likely to occur based on documented acts of piracy that occurred in such waters during the 12-month period preceding the date on which an applicable voyage begins.''.

(a) In General.--Section 4105 of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (1) by redesignating subsection (b) as subsection (c); and (2) by inserting after subsection (a) the following: ``(b) In applying this title with respect to an uninspected vessel of less than 24 meters overall in length that carries passengers to or from a port in the United States Virgin Islands, the Secretary shall substitute `12 passengers' for `6 passengers' each place it appears in section 2101(42) if the Secretary determines that the vessel complies with-- ``(1) the Code of Practice for the Safety of Small Commercial Motor Vessels (commonly referred to as the `Yellow Code'), as published by the U.K. Maritime and Coastguard Agency and in effect on January 1, 2014; or ``(2) the Code of Practice for the Safety of Small Commercial Sailing Vessels (commonly referred to as the `Blue Code'), as published by such agency and in effect on such date.''. (b) Technical Correction.--Section 4105(c) of title 46, United States Code, as redesignated by subsection (a)(1) of this section, is amended by striking ``Within twenty-four months of the date of enactment of this subsection, the'' and inserting ``The''.

Section 3316 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by redesignating subsection (f) as subsection (g), and by inserting after subsection (e) the following: ``(f)(1) Upon request of an owner or operator of an offshore supply vessel, the Secretary shall delegate the authorities set forth in paragraph (1) of subsection (b) with respect to such vessel to a classification society to which a delegation is authorized under that paragraph. A delegation by the Secretary under this subsection shall be used for any vessel inspection and examination function carried out by the Secretary, including the issuance of certificates of inspection and all other related documents. ``(2) If the Secretary determines that a certificate of inspection or related document issued under authority delegated under paragraph (1) of this subsection with respect to a vessel has reduced the operational safety of that vessel, the Secretary may terminate the certificate or document, respectively. ``(3) Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014, and for each year of the subsequent 2-year period, the Secretary shall provide to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report describing-- ``(A) the number of vessels for which a delegation was made under paragraph (1); ``(B) any savings in personnel and operational costs incurred by the Coast Guard that resulted from the delegations; and ``(C) based on measurable marine casualty and other data, any impacts of the delegations on the operational safety of vessels for which the delegations were made, and on the crew on those vessels.''.

(a) In General.--Section 3104 of title 46, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

Section 2116(b)(1)(D) of title 46, United States Code, is amended by striking ``section 93(c)'' and inserting ``section 93(c) of title 14''.

(a) In General.-- (1) Determination of covered programs.--Section 55305(d) of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (A) by amending paragraph (1) to read as follows: ``(1) The Secretary of Transportation shall annually review programs administered by other departments and agencies and determine whether each such program is subject to the requirements of this section.''; (B) by redesignating paragraph (2) as paragraph (5), and by inserting after paragraph (1) the following: ``(2) The Secretary shall have the sole responsibility to make determinations described in paragraph (1). ``(3) A determination made by the Secretary under paragraph (1) regarding a program shall remain in effect until the Secretary determines that such program is no longer subject to the requirements of this section. ``(4) Each department or agency administering a program determined by the Secretary under paragraph (1) to be subject to the requirements of this section shall administer such program in accordance with this section and any rules or guidance issued by the Secretary. The issuance of such rules or guidance is not a prerequisite to the issuance of final determinations under paragraph (1).''; (C) in paragraph (5)(A), as so redesignated, by striking ``section;'' and inserting ``section, to determine compliance with the requirements of this section;''; and (D) by adding at the end the following: ``(6) On the date on which the President submits to Congress a budget pursuant to section 1105 of title 31, the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report that-- ``(A) lists the programs determined under paragraph (1) to be subject to the requirements of this section; and ``(B) describes the results of the most recent annual review required by paragraph (5)(A), including identification of the departments and agencies that transported cargo in violation of this section and any action the Secretary took under paragraph (5) with respect to each violation.''. (2) Deadline for first review.--The Secretary of Transportation shall complete the first review and make the determinations required under the amendment made by paragraph (1)(A) by not later than December 31, 2015. (b) Rulemaking.-- (1) Authority.--Section 55305(d) of title 46, United States Code, is further amended by adding at the end the following: ``(7) The Secretary may prescribe rules, including interim rules, necessary to carry out paragraph (5). An interim rule prescribed under this paragraph shall remain in effect until superseded by a final rule.''. (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 3511(c) of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (46 U.S.C. 55305 note) is repealed.

(a) NOAA Marine Debris Program.--Section 3 of the Marine Debris Act (33 U.S.C. 1952) is amended-- (1) in subsection (c)-- (A) in the subsection heading by striking ``and Contracts'' and inserting ``Contracts, and Other Agreements''; (B) by striking paragraph (1) and inserting the following: ``(1) In general.--To carry out the purposes set forth in section 2, the Administrator, acting through the Program, may-- ``(A) enter into cooperative agreements, contracts, and other agreements with Federal agencies, States, local governments, regional agencies, interstate agencies, and other entities, including agreements to use the personnel, services, equipment, or facilities of such entities on a reimbursable or non-reimbursable basis; and ``(B) make grants to-- ``(i) State, local, and tribal governments; and ``(ii) institutions of higher education, nonprofit organizations, and commercial organizations with the expertise or responsibility to identify, determine sources of, assess, prevent, reduce, and remove marine debris.''; and (C) by striking paragraphs (4), (5), and (6) and inserting the following: ``(4) Grants.-- ``(A) Eligibility.--To be eligible for a grant under paragraph (1)(B), an entity specified in that paragraph shall submit to the Administrator a marine debris project proposal. ``(B) Review and approval.--The Administrator shall-- ``(i) review each marine debris project proposal submitted under subparagraph (A) to determine if the proposal meets grant criteria established by the Administrator and supports the purposes set forth in section 2; ``(ii) after considering any written comments and recommendations with respect to the review conducted under clause (i), approve or disapprove a grant for the proposal; and ``(iii) provide notification of that approval or disapproval to the entity that submitted the proposal. ``(C) Reporting.--Each entity receiving a grant under paragraph (1)(B) shall provide reports to the Administrator as required by the Administrator. Each report provided shall include all information determined necessary by the Administrator for evaluating the progress and success of the project for which the grant was provided and describe the impact of the grant on the identification, determination of sources, assessment, prevention, reduction, or removal of marine debris. ``(D) Training.--The Administrator may require a recipient of a grant under this subsection to provide training to persons engaged in marine debris response efforts funded by such grant with respect to the potential impacts of marine debris, including nonindigenous species related to the debris, on the economy of the United States, the marine environment, and navigation safety.''; and (2) by adding at the end the following: ``(d) Severe Marine Debris Events.-- ``(1) Grant preference.--In evaluating proposals for grants under subsection (c), the Administrator may give preference in approving grants to proposals that address a severe marine debris event. ``(2) Request for a declaration.-- ``(A) In general.--For purposes of paragraph (1), the Governor of a State may request that the Administrator declare a severe marine debris event in such State or a region that includes such State. ``(B) Response to requests.--Not later than 30 days after the Administrator receives a request under subparagraph (A), the Administrator shall either-- ``(i) declare a severe marine debris event with respect to the request; or ``(ii) submit a response to the Governor who submitted the request, explaining why the Administrator has not declared a severe marine debris event with respect to the request.''. (b) Definitions.--Section 7 of the Marine Debris Act (33 U.S.C. 1956) is amended-- (1) by moving paragraph (5) to appear before paragraph (6); (2) by redesignating paragraphs (5), (6), and (7) as paragraphs (6), (7), and (8), respectively; and (3) by inserting after paragraph (4) the following: ``(5) Nonindigenous species.--The term `nonindigenous species' has the meaning given that term in section 1003 of the Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990 (16 U.S.C. 4702).''. (c) Severe Marine Debris Event Determination.-- (1) Authority to provide funds.-- (A) In general.--The Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration may provide funds to an eligible entity impacted by the covered severe marine debris event to assist such entity with the costs of any activity carried out to address the effects of such event. (B) Funding.--The Administrator may provide funds under subparagraph (A) using any funds provided by the Government of Japan for activities to address the effects of the covered severe marine debris event. (C) Definitions.--In this subsection, the following definitions apply: (i) Covered severe marine debris event.--The term ``covered severe marine debris event'' means the events, including marine debris, resulting from the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami. (ii) Eligible entity.--The term ``eligible entity'' means any State (as defined in section 7 of the Marine Debris Act (33 U.S.C. 1956)), local, or tribal government. (2) Repeal.--The Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2012 (Public Law 112-213) is amended-- (A) in the table of contents in section 1(b) by striking the item relating to section 609; and (B) by striking section 609.

Section 55305 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following: ``(f) Minimum Tonnage.--With respect to commodities transported under the activities specified in section 55314(b), the percentage specified in subsection (b) of this section shall be treated as 75 percent.''.

(a) Establishment of Advisory Committee.-- (1) Establishment.--Chapter 81 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

No later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report on the number of jobs, including vessel construction and vessel operating jobs, that would be created in the United States maritime industry each year in 2015 through 2025 if liquified natural gas exported from the United States were required to be carried-- (1) before December 31, 2018, on vessels documented under the laws of the United States; and (2) after such date, on vessels documented under the laws

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Federal Maritime Commission $24,700,000 for each of fiscal years 2015 and 2016.

(a) In General.--Section 301(b) of title 46, United States Code, is amended-- (1) by amending paragraph (2) to read as follows: ``(2) Terms.--The term of each Commissioner is 5 years. When the term of a Commissioner ends, the Commissioner may continue to serve until a successor is appointed and qualified, but for a period not to exceed one year. Except as provided in paragraph (3), no individual may serve more than 2 terms.''; and (2) by redesignating paragraph (3) as paragraph (5), and inserting after paragraph (2) the following: ``(3) Vacancies.--A vacancy shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment. An individual appointed to fill a vacancy is appointed only for the unexpired term of the individual being succeeded. An individual appointed to fill a vacancy may serve 2 terms in addition to the remainder of the term for which the predecessor of that individual was appointed. ``(4) Conflicts of interest.-- ``(A) Limitation on relationships with regulated entities.--A Commissioner may not have a pecuniary interest in, hold an official relation to, or own stocks or bonds of any entity the Commission regulates under chapter 401 of this title. ``(B) Limitation on other activities.--A Commissioner may not engage in another business, vocation, or employment.''. (b) Applicability.--The amendment made by subsection (a)(1) does not apply with respect to a Commissioner of the Federal Maritime Commission appointed and confirmed by the Senate before the date of enactment of this Act.

This title may be cited as the ``Commercial Vessel Discharge Reform Act of 2014''.

Section 2(a) of Public Law 110-299 (33 U.S.C. 1342 note) is amended by striking ``during the period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act and ending on December 18,

Section 421 of the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-241; 120 Stat. 547) is amended-- (1) in subsection (b)-- (A) by amending paragraph (1) to read as follows: ``(1) In general.--Subsection (a) only applies to a foreign citizen who holds a credential to serve as an officer on a fishing vessel or vessel of similar tonnage.''; and (B) in paragraph (2), by striking ``An equivalent credential'' and inserting ``A credential''; and (2) by striking subsections (c), (e), and (f) and redesignating subsection (d) as subsection (c).

The vessel assigned United States official number 1205366 is deemed a new vessel effective on the date of delivery of the vessel after January 1, 2012, from a privately owned United States shipyard, if no encumbrances are on record with the Coast Guard at the time of the issuance of the new certificate of documentation for the vessel.

(a) Authority.--The Commandant of the Coast Guard may lease under section 93(a)(13) of title 14, United States Code, submerged lands and tidelands under the control of the Coast Guard without regard to the limitation under that section with respect to lease duration. (b) Limitation.--The Commandant may lease submerged lands and tidelands under subsection (a) only if-- (1) lease payments are-- (A) received exclusively in the form of cash; (B) equal to the fair market value of the leased submerged lands or tidelands, as determined by the Commandant; and (C) deposited in the fund established under section 687 of title 14, United States Code; and (2) the lease does not provide authority to or commit the Coast Guard to use or support any improvements to such submerged lands or tidelands, or obtain goods or services from the lessee.

(a) In General.--Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Transportation, in consultation with the Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is operating, shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a national maritime strategy. (b) Contents.--The strategy required under subsection (a) shall-- (1) identify-- (A) Federal regulations and policies that reduce the competitiveness of United States flag vessels in the international trade; and (B) the impact of reduced cargo flow due to reductions in the number of members of the United States Armed Forces stationed or deployed outside of the United States; and (2) include recommendations to-- (A) make United States flag vessels more competitive in shipping routes between United States and foreign ports; (B) increase the use of United States flag vessels to carry cargo imported to and exported from the United States; (C) assure compliance by Federal agencies with chapter 553 of title 46, United States Code; (D) increase the use of third-party inspection and certification authorities to inspect and certify vessels; (E) increase the use of short sea transportation routes designated under section 55601(c) of title 46, United States Code, to enhance intermodal freight movements; and (F) enhance United States shipbuilding capability.

Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and thereafter with the submission of the budget proposal submitted for each of fiscal years 2016, 2017, and 2018 under section 1105 of title 31, United States Code, the Secretary of the department in which the Coast Guard is operating shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate, a report on-- (1) the status of the negotiations at the International Maritime Organization regarding the establishment of a draft international code of safety for ships operating in polar waters, popularly known as the Polar Code, and any amendments proposed by such a code to be made to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea and the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships; (2) the coming into effect of such a code and such amendments for nations that are parties to those conventions; (3) impacts, for coastal communities located in the Arctic (as that term is defined in the section 112 of the Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 (15 U.S.C. 4111)) of such a code or such amendments, on-- (A) the costs of delivering fuel and freight; and (B) the safety of maritime transportation; and (4) actions the Secretary must take to implement the requirements of such a code and such amendments.

(a) Exemption.--Section 8902 of title 46, United States Code, shall not apply to the vessel John Craig (United States official number D1110613) when such vessel is operating on the portion of the Kentucky River, Kentucky, located at approximately mile point 158, in Pool Number 9, between Lock and Dam Number 9 and Lock and Dam Number 10. (b) Application.--Subsection (a) shall apply on and after the date on which the Secretary determines that a licensing requirement has been established under Kentucky State law that applies to an operator of the vessel John Craig.

(a) In General.--The Commandant of the Coast Guard shall enter into an arrangement with the National Academy of Sciences to conduct an assessment of authorities under subtitle II of title 46, United States Code, that have been delegated to the Coast Guard that impact the ability of vessels documented under the laws of the United States to effectively compete in the carriage of merchandise and passengers in the international trade. (b) Review of Differences With IMO Standards.--The assessment under subsection (a) shall include a review of differences between United States laws, policies, regulations, and guidance governing the inspection of vessels documented under the laws of the United States and standards set by the International Maritime Organization governing the inspection of vessels. (c) Deadline.--Not later than 180 days after the date on which the Commandant enters into an arrangement with the National Academy of Sciences under subsection (a), the Commandant shall submit the assessment required under such subsection to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate.

Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Commandant of the Coast Guard shall submit to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a survey of the parcel of real property under the administrative control of the Coast Guard, consisting of approximately 1.95 acres (measured at the mean low-water mark) located at the entrance to Gig Harbor, Washington, and commonly known as the Gig Harbor Sand Spit Area.

(a) Fishing Safety Training Grant Program.--Section 4502(i)(4) of title 46, United States Code, is amended by striking ``2010 through 2014'' and inserting ``2015 and

Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from California (Mr. Hunter) and the gentleman from California (Mr. Garamendi) each will control 20 minutes.

The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on H.R. 4005.

Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from California?

There was no objection.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

H.R. 4005 is the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014. It reauthorizes funding for the Coast Guard through fiscal year 2016 at levels that are fiscally sound and will reverse the misguided cuts proposed by this administration. The President proposed to slash the service's acquisition budget by over 20 percent, reduce the number of servicemembers by over 1,300, undermine readiness by cutting programmed hours for aircraft, and jeopardize the success of research and rescue missions by taking fixed-wing aircraft crews off of immediate alert status.

The President's budget request will only worsen the Coast Guard's growing gaps in mission performance, increase acquisition delays, drive up the costs of the new assets, and deny our servicemembers the critical resources needed to perform their duties.

H.R. 4005 provides sufficient funding to ensure these cuts do not happen and the service has what it needs to successfully conduct its missions.

In 2012--that is the last year we have the numbers for--the Coast Guard responded to over 19,700 search and rescue cases; saved over 3,500 lives; conducted over 20,000 safety, security, and environmental inspections of U.S. and foreign flag commercial vessels, more importantly; and interdicted over 2,900 undocumented migrants and 163 metric tons of illegal drugs.

The Coast Guard is our first line of defense in this country. H.R. 4005 is going to fund the eighth national security cutter. That is the last one. It is a 425-foot frigate that the Navy is even jealous of.

It funds six fast response cutters over the next 2 years. It also prepares us to buy the new offshore patrol cutter, and it also transfers 14 C-27Js from the Air Force to the Coast Guard for not a penny--not a dime--not a penny--totally free--transfers it from the Air Force to the Coast Guard. It can put those into effect.

The bill also makes several reforms to Coast Guard authorities, as well as laws governing shipping and navigation. Specifically, H.R. 4005 supports Coast Guard servicemembers by authorizing military pay raises and enhancing military benefits.

There are about 42,000 Active Duty Coast Guardsmen patrolling all the navigable waters throughout the United States in rivers, bays, and seas and also every single piece of coastline that we have--42,000.

Compare that to the Marine Corps numbers, over 175,000; the Army, over 400,000; yet the Coast Guard is responsible for every single piece of American water, every inland waterway, the Great Lakes, and every river. That is what the Coast Guard is responsible for.

If you talk about weapons of mass destruction coming in through American ports from the ocean, the Coast Guard is our first line of defense there, too.

This bill improves Coast Guard mission effectiveness by replacing and modernizing Coast Guard assets in a cost-effective manner. It enhances oversight of the Coast Guard, reduces inefficient operations, and saves taxpayer dollars by making commonsense reforms to Coast Guard missions and administration.

The bill helps veterans make an easier transition from the Coast Guard into the life of a mariner, so they can get out and get good-paying jobs in industry, so it gives them time and service for their Coast Guard time, as opposed to making them go through all of the hurdles, jumps, and hoops that you would have to go through otherwise.

It encourages job growth in the maritime sector by cutting regulatory burdens on job creators, and it reauthorizes and reforms the structure and operations of the Federal Maritime Commission.

H.R. 4005 is a bipartisan effort that was put together in close consultation with the minority. I want to thank Ranking Members Rahall and Garamendi for their efforts and Chairman Shuster for his leadership.

I would also like to thank John Rayfield and Geoff Gosselin on the committee staff, whose depths of knowledge on the Coast Guard and Maritime issues are unfathomable, and Lieutenant Commander Stephen West, my Coast Guard fellow that was our reality check in this committee by giving us great, sane advice when we needed it.

Finally, I want to take a minute to point out that this will be the last Coast Guard authorization bill that will benefit from the advice and support of the only Member of Congress with service in the Coast Guard, our colleague and friend, Howard Coble.

Howard is a Korean war veteran with 5 years of Active Duty in the Coast Guard and another 18 years in the Coast Guard Reserve. He is the founder of the Congressional Coast Guard Caucus, as well as an active member and former chairman of our subcommittee.

Throughout his career in Congress, Howard has been a tireless advocate for the men and women of the Coast Guard. I thank him and commend him for his service to our Nation and his contributions to this and past Coast Guard authorizations and to this Congress.

I reserve the balance of my time.

Dear Mr. Chairman: I write concerning H.R. 4005, the Howard Coble Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014, as amended. This legislation includes matters that fall within the Rule X jurisdiction of the Committee on Armed Services. Our committee recognizes the importance of H.R. 4005, and the need for the legislation to move expeditiously. Our committee also appreciates efforts by your staff to coordinate on matters that fall in our Rule X jurisdiction in advance. Therefore, while we have a valid claim to jurisdiction over this legislation, I do not intend to request sequential referral on H.R. 4005. By waiving consideration of the bill, the Committee on Armed Services does not waive any future jurisdictional claim over the subject matters contained in the bill which fall within its Rule X jurisdiction. I request that you urge the Speaker to name members of this committee to any conference committee which is named to consider the provisions over which we have jurisdiction. Please place this letter and your committee's response into the committee report to accompany H.R. 4005 and into the Congressional Record during consideration of the measure on the House floor. Thank you for the cooperative spirit in which you have worked regarding this matter and others between our respective committees. Sincerely, Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon, Chairman.

Rep. John Garamendi

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Mr. Speaker, I yield myself as much time as I may consume.

H.R. 4005, the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014, is bipartisan legislation.

Maintaining a safe, reliable, and efficient maritime economy enables foreign and domestic trade to fuel the U.S. economy, and it remains vital. This legislation will provide the Coast Guard with the resources and policy tools it needs to fulfill its vital missions.

I want to thank Chairman Hunter and his staff for their willingness to work with me and several of the Democratic Members, and I also want to commend Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member Nick Rahall for their valuable contributions to this bill. We thank the gentlemen.

H.R. 4005 will provide not only the budget stability for the Coast Guard for the next 2 years, it will also advance several important initiatives to revitalize our U.S. maritime industry.

For example, H.R. 4005 will better align the Coast Guard's mission needs with its long-term capital planning and annual budgetary processes, and explicit cooperative agreement authority is also granted.

It provides a new multiyear procurement authority for the offshore patrol cutter, the OPC, a critical and new asset. It directs the administration to enforce our cargo preference laws. No way out, guys. Enforce those laws and regulations, something that is long overdue.

It will streamline the administrative processes to make it easier for our veterans to get their civilian licenses and find jobs in the merchant marine.

Now, natural gas is a strategic American asset that is allowing America to enjoy low energy costs and a resurgence of American manufacturing. The export of LNG at a modest level could create even more American jobs if that LNG is transported on American-made LNG tankers flying the American flag with American sailors.

The currently approved export terminals will require approximately 100 LNG tankers. This tanker fleet could be American made, phased in as the LNG export terminals come on line and LNG exports grow. American shipyards could build these tankers over the next decade and beyond, creating thousands of jobs and maintaining a vital industrial base for America and our Navy.

This legislation does direct the Government Accountability Office, the GAO, to assess how future transport of LNG on U.S. tankers could affect American job creation in the U.S. maritime industry. It is a good first step, but we should be doing more.

This legislation also directs the Department of Transportation to develop a new national maritime strategy, a much-needed revision and new thought into what that strategy could be.

The bill authorizes a needed increase in the funding for the Federal Maritime Commission, and the bill reauthorizes the Small Shipyard Grant Program through fiscal year 2017 to improve the quality and competitiveness of our small, domestic shipyards.

There is more to be done. Specifically, title 11 needs to be rewritten and redone so that our American shipyards will have the loan guaranties that they need to construct the ships, perhaps those LNG tankers.

In closing, Mr. Speaker, H.R. 4005 is responsible legislation. It deserves an ``aye'' vote, and I want to thank all of who have been involved in writing it.

I reserve the balance of my time.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the distinguished gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Shuster), the chairman of the full Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.

Rep. Bill Shuster

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I thank the gentleman from California.

Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 4005, the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014.

The United States Coast Guard enforces all U.S. laws on U.S. waterways and, when necessary, on the high seas. This service saves the life and property of those who sail in our waters for recreation and commerce.

They protect our marine natural resources and secure our borders against illegal drugs and against human trafficking. They have a huge job, and they deserve our thanks.

H.R. 4005 provides the service with our support. This bipartisan legislation authorizes the Coast Guard to carry out all its vital missions, improves its mission effectiveness, and helps replace and modernize aging Coast Guard assets in a cost-effective manner; it enhances oversight and reduces inefficiency to save taxpayer dollars.

Additionally, the bill strengthens U.S. maritime transportation, reduces regulatory burdens to create jobs and encourage economic growth, and improves the Nation's competitiveness.

Specifically, it authorizes funding for Coast Guard activities in 2015 and 2016 at fiscally responsible levels that will allow the Coast Guard to continue updating its fleet of aging cutters and continue operations, supports Coast Guard servicemen and women, and encourages the Coast Guard to work with the private sector; it enhances Congressional oversight, improves Coast Guard acquisition activities, requires development of a national maritime strategy, creates opportunities for our veterans, and it reforms the Federal Maritime Commission.

I would also like to make note, as Chairman Hunter noted, this is our colleague Howard Coble's last term as a member of the Coast Guard Subcommittee. The gentleman from North Carolina has served on the subcommittee and its predecessor, the Merchant Marine Committee, since he came to Congress in 1985.

He is the only former coastie now serving in Congress. I know the Coast Guard appreciates his strong support for the service, particularly during his term as subcommittee chairman on this committee. I know all the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee members join me in wishing Howard a well-deserved and happy retirement.

I want to thank and commend Subcommittee Chairman Hunter for introducing this bill and working with Ranking Member Rahall and also Ranking Member Garamendi for their work on this bill.

I also will take notice that our good friend from the Virgin Islands is in the Chamber working on a couple provisions that I know are going to be very beneficial to the U.S. territories and to the U.S. Virgin Islands. I thank her for her hard work on this legislation.

I look forward to working with the Senate to get the final version of this bill enacted this year.

Rep. John Garamendi

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Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the good lady from Los Angeles, California (Ms. Hahn).

Rep. Janice Hahn

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Mr. Garamendi, thank you for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, today, I would like to discuss the importance of an amendment that I offered to this bill, but withdrew it because of jurisdictional concerns.

In exchange for dropping this amendment, the language was supposed to be included in a manager's amendment, but, unfortunately, the suspension calendar precluded this from happening. It is my hope that, with the help of the chairman, this issue will be taken up during the conference with the Senate.

Under current law, port authorities are required to develop port security plans which are then submitted to the U.S. Coast Guard for review. However, ports are not required to address cybersecurity in these plans.

Without a requirement, many of our ports have not addressed this issue, creating a gap in our Nation's port security.

Last July, the Brookings Institute released a report stating our Nation's port cybersecurity awareness is remarkably low. Without requiring ports to address this vulnerability, we risk exposing our Nation to a disruption that could devastate our economy and grind the flow of commerce to a halt in a matter of days.

That is why I offered an amendment to this bill that would have required that ports address cybersecurity in their port security plans that they submit to the Coast Guard every 5 years. Unfortunately, this language was not included in the final bill, and it is my hope that it is put in the bill during the conference as it was intended.

By requiring every port to begin to address cybersecurity in their port security plans, we can help avoid a potentially devastating attack that would leave our Nation's freight network crippled beyond repair.

I appreciate the chairman's willingness to work with me on this issue, and I look forward to his support in trying to address this issue in conference.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Will the gentlewoman yield?

Rep. Janice Hahn

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I yield to the gentleman from California.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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To the extent that the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee has jurisdiction over this issue, I look forward to working with the gentlelady from California to include her proposal to include cybersecurity as an element in facility security plans required under chapter 701 of title 46 because it is important, and we need to figure out who is the best at it, who can do it.

It might not be the Coast Guard. It might not be the actual ports. It might be the Navy. I think it is important, and I look forward to working with you on the issue.

The time of the gentlewoman has expired.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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I reserve the balance of my time.

Rep. John Garamendi

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Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Thompson).

Rep. Bennie Thompson

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I thank the gentleman from California for the time, and I also thank him for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, at the outset, I would like to commend Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member Rahall for their hard work on the legislation before the House today.

H.R. 4005, the Howard Coble Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014, authorizes the United States Coast Guard, a critical component of the Department of Homeland Security, for 2 years.

Every day, the men and women of the Coast Guard work to protect our ports and waterways from terrorist attack and other dangers.

It is for that very reason that the Committee on Homeland Security should have considered this legislation. Unfortunately, Chairman McCaul rejected my request that, consistent with precedent the committee established in prior Congresses, he insist on a referral of this measure.

Doing so would have ensured that the members of the Committee on Homeland Security could inform the bill's security-related provisions in an open markup setting.

As a result of Chairman McCaul's decision to waive the right of the committee to consider this measure, the House has before it a bill that does not fully take into account the statutory mission of the Department of Homeland Security component it authorizes.

In fact, it does not have a single provision solely dedicated to port and maritime security. You just heard the gentlelady from California talk about port security and how important it is, and I appreciate the gentleman from California saying that he would work with her, but it is also a responsibility of the Committee on Homeland Security.

While disappointing, I do not blame the leadership of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for the absence of such provisions. It is the responsibility of the Committee on Homeland Security to leave its mark on this important homeland security legislation.

The time of the gentleman has expired.

Rep. John Garamendi

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I yield an additional 15 seconds to the gentleman.

Rep. Bennie Thompson

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To be clear, this is not a case of the Committee on Homeland Security lacking the jurisdiction needed to inform the legislation before us today. It is a case of a chairman failing to ensure his committee was afforded the right to exercise its jurisdictional authority.

Dear Chairman McCaul and Subcommittee Chairman Miller: We write to urge you to insist upon a sequential referral of H.R. 4005, the ``Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014,'' and to afford the Members of the Committee on Homeland Security (the Committee) the opportunity to consider this important homeland security legislation in an open markup session. Despite H.R. 4005 containing numerous provisions within the Committee's Rule X, clause 1(j) jurisdiction, the Speaker chose not to refer the bill to the Committee upon introduction, opting to refer the bill to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure (T&I) alone. As you are aware, H.R. 4005, as ordered to be reported by T&I today, contains numerous provisions within the legislative jurisdiction of the Committee. Since being established as a standing committee in the 109th Congress, the Committee has waived its right to a sequential referral of legislation authorizing the United States Coast Guard (USCG) on only two occasions. The first instance was in the 109th Congress and the most recent was during the 112th Congress. In contrast, in the 110th and 111th Congresses, we made certain that bills authorizing the USCG, a critical component of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), were referred to the Committee. As recently as last week, the Committee's Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security held a public hearing to explore the USCG's homeland security mission. During that hearing, Chairman Miller emphasized the important homeland security mission of the USCG when she stated: ``Since 9/11, the Coast Guard has taken an ever-increasing role in the protection of our nation. We've given the Coast Guard additional responsibility. We have tasked them to specifically focus their limited resources on port and maritime security.'' We concur with Chairman Miller's sentiment regarding the critical role the USCG plays in ensuring the security of our ports and maritime system. To ensure H.R. 4005 reflects the USCG's homeland security mission, we urge you to insist on a referral and hold an open markup session of the bill. In addition to our desire to see the Members of our Committee have an opportunity to shape the policy in a bill authorizing a critical component of DHS, we believe it is critical that the Committee exercise its jurisdictional prerogative whenever possible. H.R. 4005 represents an opportunity for you to ensure that the Committee exercises its existing jurisdictional authority to the fullest extent possible. Thank you, in advance, for your attention to this request. Should you or your staff have any questions on this matter, please contact Ms. Rosaline Cohen, Chief Counsel for Legislation of the Committee on Homeland Security, at x6-

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from Alaska (Mr. Young).

Rep. Don Young

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Mr. Speaker, I would like to indulge in a colloquy with Mr. Hunter.

I want to thank the chairman of the subcommittee for yielding and, again, thank him for his work. Section 221 of H.R. 4005 prohibits the Secretary of Homeland Security from dismantling or disposing of any former LORAN system infrastructure for at least 1 year from the date of enactment of the act or until the date the Secretary notifies the committee that such infrastructure is not needed for a positioning, navigation, and timing system to provide redundant capability in the event GPS signals are disrupted, whichever is later; is that the chairman's understanding?

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Will the gentleman yield?

Rep. Don Young

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I yield to the gentleman from California.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Yes, it is.

Rep. Don Young

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I ask the chairman, I am aware there are several important issues surrounding the disposition of LORAN stations, including the disposition of lands associated with them that we should closely examine and deal with in an appropriate manner.

I ask the chairman and my colleagues on the committee to work with me to resolve these issues in the context of H.R. 4005 as this bill moves forward.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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To the extent that these issues are within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, I look forward to working with the gentleman from Alaska with respect to resolving the disposition of the assets associated with the Coast Guard LORAN stations in a manner satisfactory to the longest-serving member of the subcommittee and its predecessors.

Rep. Don Young

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I thank the chairman. I look forward to working on this issue further, and I also want to extend my heartfelt congratulations and best wishes to the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Coble), the only former coastguardsman now serving in Congress.

To find a finer gentleman and colleague than Mr. Coble would be difficult, indeed. We will miss you, Howard, so please stay in touch.

Rep. John Garamendi

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I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from Oregon (Ms. Bonamici).

Rep. Suzanne Bonamici

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Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from California for yielding.

Mr. Speaker, I rise to join my colleagues today in support of H.R. 4005, the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act. I know that the chairmen and ranking members have worked diligently on the underlying bill, and I commend them for their efforts.

Importantly, I am grateful for the opportunity to work with them to add language from two bills I introduced to help coastal communities dealing with increasing marine debris.

Since the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan in 2011, residents of the Pacific Northwest have faced an increase in the volume of marine debris reaching our coast. This debris is a hazard to navigators, a threat to the marine environment, and a potential drag on coastal tourism.

Following the arrival of a 66-foot dock on an Oregon beach in June 2012, I worked with a bipartisan coalition on two bills to improve the Federal response to marine debris.

The first proposal, which I introduced with the gentlewoman from Washington (Ms. Herrera Beutler), was introduced to expedite NOAA's grant process for debris cleanup by allowing NOAA to prioritize grant applications from communities affected by a severe marine debris event.

I partnered with Congressman Don Young on the second proposal to allow NOAA to reimburse States for debris cleanup costs with a generous $5 million gift from the Government of Japan.

I would like to thank the chairman and ranking member of the Natural Resources Committee for their support, with special thanks to my Oregon colleague, Ranking Member DeFazio.

I would also like to thank the chairman and ranking member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee for including these proposals in the underlying bill.

I am pleased to have worked with so many Members on the passage of these bipartisan marine provisions, and I urge a ``yes'' vote on the underlying bill.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Meadows).

Rep. Mark Meadows

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Mr. Speaker, I rise today and thank the leadership of my good friend and colleague from California (Mr. Hunter) on his recognition that we need to go forward with this Coast Guard reauthorization.

Not only does it put in good reforms and continues to work in a real way to support our men and women who serve in the Coast Guard, but it does so in--quite frankly, in a very streamlined way, so I thank the leadership of Congressman Hunter.

I want to go on further and recognize a gentleman from North Carolina, the dean of the delegation, Congressman Howard Coble. Not only is Howard a good friend, but he has served with distinction for more than 30 years here in this House.

Being an active member of the Coast Guard, it was his leadership and truly his work with Congressman Hunter that really set this in motion. Having, at the age of 83, decided that it is time for him to retire from representing the people of the great State of North Carolina, I just want to acknowledge this particular day, Mr. Speaker, on a great statesman, truly a gentleman.

When you look up ``gentleman'' in the dictionary, it should have Howard Coble's picture right beside it. He is the epitome of what it is to not only represent the people of North Carolina in such a fine fashion, but he works across party aisles.

He works with his colleagues, both Democrats and Republicans, to make sure that our country is served in the best way possible. It is with great pleasure that I get to speak on behalf of this bill and, in doing so, honor a man who knows the Coast Guard well and knows that the men and women who serve there serve our country in a the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Kilmer).

Rep. Derek Kilmer

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Mr. Speaker, I rise to engage in a colloquy with the gentleman from California (Mr. Hunter).

It is my understanding that this legislation contains a provision that would survey property at the open water entrance from the Puget Sound to the city of Gig Harbor, Washington, commonly known as the Gig Harbor sand spit area.

That property was leased to the city by the Coast Guard in 1988 to construct a small replica lighthouse with a private aid to navigation on the parcel and that the city and other local parties have financed, operated, and maintained the sand spit area, lighthouse, and private aid since that time and have used the property primarily for recreational purposes.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Will the gentleman yield?

Rep. Derek Kilmer

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I yield to the chairman.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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That is my understanding as well.

Rep. Derek Kilmer

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Mr. Chairman, the Coast Guard in 2005 determined that the property was in excess to their operational requirements and authorized the disposal of the property.

In addition, the city has been in discussions with the Coast Guard since 2011 regarding transferring the property.

I yield to the chairman.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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That is also my understanding.

Rep. Derek Kilmer

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Mr. Chairman, the legislation before us today provides for a survey of the Gig Harbor sand spit area.

Am I correct in understanding that, when the Federal Government completes the survey, the chairman will work with me to convey this property to the city?

I yield to the chairman.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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To the extent that the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee has jurisdiction over this property, I will work with the gentleman from Washington to convey the property to the city.

Rep. Derek Kilmer

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Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I appreciate you working with me on this issue.

It is very important to my constituents, and I look forward to a final resolution in the very near future. The Gig Harbor sand spit area is a cherished maritime gateway to the city of Gig Harbor, which is an area in my district which has a long and rich history of boating and commercial fishing.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, how much time do I have remaining?

The gentleman from California has 8\1/2\ minutes remaining.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

One thing that this bill does is not only does it inventory this property--or it would--it also works to reduce the Coast Guard's excess property in general.

It requires the Coast Guard to conduct an inventory of all of its real property and to determine which property can be divested or consolidated to save taxpayers money and to give the land back to the municipalities and cities and counties in which it resides.

This is not just a Coast Guard bill. As the ranking member spoke about--and the chairman of the full committee, Mr. Shuster, it is beyond the Coast Guard in that this bill is important because it deals with maritime transportation. A healthy maritime industry is vital to our national security.

Throughout our history, the Navy has relied on U.S.-flagged commercial vessels, crewed by American merchant mariners to carry troops, weapons, and supplies to the battlefield.

When I deployed on my second tour to Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004 out of San Diego, I was in charge as the logistics officer of driving down all of our equipment with Humvees and our big battery cannons down to the local pier in San Diego. We then put this on a roll-on/roll-off boat.

I made sure everything was the way it was supposed to be, and that is how all of our equipment got over to Iraq. This boat was driven--manned by American merchant mariners.

It was not driven by the Navy or the Coast Guard, but by civilian mariners that do this for us; so I have a very close personal relationship, if you will, because all of the gear that we fell in on in Fallujah was stuff we had shipped over from San Diego to Iraq.

During Operations Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Iraqi Freedom, U.S.-flagged commercial vessels transported 63 percent of all military cargos, like mine, moved to Afghanistan and Iraq.

Since we cannot rely on foreign vessels and crews to provide for our national security--let's say we relied on the Russians to move our military equipment like we rely on them to move our people and equipment into space--it is critical that we maintain a robust fleet of U.S.-flagged vessels, a large cadre of skilled American workers, and a strong shipyard industrial base.

Let me go through what the maritime sector provides to our economy very quickly. The U.S. maritime industry currently employs more than 260,000 Americans, providing nearly $29 billion in annual wages.

There are more than 40,000 commercial vessels currently flying the American flags on our waterways, and the vast majority of these vessels are engaged in domestic commerce, moving over 100 million passengers and $400 billion worth of goods between ports in the U.S. on an annual basis.

Each year, the U.S. maritime industry accounts for over $100 billion in economic output, and these are not just port cities that get this. It is the inland waterways, the Mississippi, the Great Lakes, all of the different locks and dams throughout Pennsylvania and the Northeast, including the Colorado River.

Those are places where the Coast Guard is hard at work and our maritime industry is creating jobs and keeping people's mortgages paid and food on their table.

With that, Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Rep. John Garamendi

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Mr. Speaker, might I inquire as to the amount of time I have remaining?

The gentleman from California has 9\1/4\ minutes remaining.

Rep. John Garamendi

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I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).

(Ms. JACKSON LEE asked and was given permission to revise and extend her remarks.)

Mr. Speaker, I thank the distinguished gentleman for yielding, and I thank the manager of this legislation.

I rise with an appreciation for this legislation and also a concern. I think this legislation would have been important to have been referred and for the waiver not to be exercised to the Homeland Security Committee.

I serve as the ranking member on the Border Security and Maritime Security Committee, and it is known that the Coast Guard has a responsibility for defending the Nation's maritime borders. It is charged with port waterway and coastal security.

With that in mind, it would be appropriate to address those questions of Homeland Security. I notice that this bill limits and reduces the number of commissioned officers, alters the mission of Coast Guard centers, and did not come before our committee.

At a hearing on the oil spill in Houston, which has an impact on America's waterways, particularly around the gulf region and has an impact on security, it was clear that the Coast Guard were the first responders. They were the first responders in terms of the potential rescue. They were the first responders in terms of being the cops of the waterway, to ensure that all of those who needed to use that waterway and the ports were able do so. They were the ones that protected the individuals that were on cruise lines that were left offshore, and they were, of course, taking care of commerce. This is clearly part of the responsibility of Homeland Security.

As I indicated, we are very proud of the Coast Guard. I am always reminded of the great service they rendered during Hurricane Katrina, saving over 1,000 persons.

I rise today to hope that we will have an opportunity to address the questions dealing with security. As I do so, however, I want to commend Admiral Robert Papp, Jr., who is a commandant now of the United States Coast Guard, 24th United States Coast Guard Commandant and has served 39 years. Let us salute this great American.

The time of the gentlewoman has expired.

Rep. John Garamendi

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I yield the gentlewoman an additional 30 seconds.

Commandant Papp is a great American. He has been a friend to not only those of us in the United States Congress who are on the responsible committees, but he has been a friend to his men and women that serve in the United States Coast Guard.

Commandant Papp, we salute you for your grand service and look forward to your continued service to America, but more importantly, we owe you a great deal of respect and honor. Thank you so very much.

I thank the gentleman.

Mr. Speaker, I rise to speak with reservations regarding the consideration of H.R. 4005, the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act under a suspension because the bill establishes appropriations limits; reduces the number of commissioned officers; alters the mission of Coast Guard Centers; and did not come before the Homeland Security Committee under a sequential referral.

The bill before the House accomplishes several goals that may have been shared by the House Transportation Committee and the House Committee on Homeland Security, but it also addresses areas that should have had more deliberation before coming to the House Floor for a vote with no opportunity to amend the legislation.

On February 11, 2014, as Ranking Member of the House Committee on Homeland Security's Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security, I joined Ranking Member of the Full Homeland Security Committee Bennie Thompson in writing to urge a sequential referral of H.R. 4005, the ``Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014.''

We were disappointed with the decision of the Homeland Security's Chair and Chairwoman of the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security to waive the Committee's right to a sequential referral of this important homeland security legislation.

The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is charged with port, waterway, and coastal security, putting them on the forefront of defending the Nation's maritime borders.

On March 25, 2014, I participated in the hearing held by the Homeland Security's Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communication when FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate testified.

One of the provisions of H.R. 4005 would prohibit the Secretary of Homeland Security from making a determination that a waterway is navigable for purposes of the Coast Guard's jurisdiction without conducting a rulemaking under appropriate administrative procedures.

This provision of H.R. 4005 could have huge repercussions in an emergency related to a waterway's safety.

I raised the issue with Administrator Fugate regarding the critical role of the Coast Guard in making sure that our ports and waterways are navigable because of the 168,000 gallons of oil spilled due to a tugboat accident into the Port of Houston which led to a shutdown.

The Port of Houston is critical infrastructure:

According to the Department of Commerce in 2012, Texas exports totaled $265 billion.

The Port of Houston is a 25-mile-long complex of diversified public and private facilities located just a few hours' sailing time from the Gulf of Mexico.

In 2012 ship channel-related businesses contribute 1,026,820 jobs and generate more than $178.5 billion in statewide economic impact.

For the past 11 consecutive years, Texas has outpaced the rest of the country in exports.

First ranked U.S. port in foreign tonnage;

Second ranked U.S. port in total tonnage;

Seventh ranked U.S. container port by total TEUs in 2012;

Largest Texas port with 46 percent of market share by tonnage;

Largest Texas container port with 96 percent market share in containers by total TEUs in 2012;

Largest Gulf Coast container port, handling 67 percent of U.S. Gulf Coast container traffic in 2012;

Second ranked U.S. port in terms of cargo value (based on CBP Customs port definitions).

The Government Accountability Office (GAO), reports that this port, and its waterways, and vessels are part of an economic engine handling more than $700 billion in merchandise annually.

The Port of Houston houses approximately 100 steamship lines offering services that link Houston with 1,053 ports in 203 countries.

The Port of Houston has $15 billion petrochemical complex, the largest in the nation and second largest worldwide.

The bill does establish rules for the Coast Guard engaging in ice patrol agreements with other nations and the need to establish reimbursement agreements prior to the commitment of resources in ice patrols.

The bill provides for compensation of ship owners and operators who provide necessary support to seafarers paroled into the United States to facilitate investigations, reporting, documentation, or adjudications.

The bill also addresses the definition of ``high-risk waters,'' for the purpose of determining when owners and operators of U.S. vessels carrying government-impelled cargo are to be reimbursed for the cost of providing armed on-board safety personnel.

Since being established as a standing committee in the 109th Congress, the Homeland Security Committee has failed to receive a referral of a bill authorizing the Coast Guard only during periods of Republican control of the House of Representatives.

In contrast, during the 110th and 111th Congresses, during our time in the Majority, we insisted that both bills authorizing the Coast Guard be referred to the Committee.

Given the critical role the Coast Guard plays in ensuring the security of our ports and maritime system the Homeland Security Committee should never waive its right to consider legislation directly related to homeland security. The Committee on Homeland Security had no chance to provide valuable input in the drafting of H.R. 4005.

H.R. 4005, is an important bill that should have had the attention of the House Committee on Homeland Security, and if not members should have had an opportunity to offer amendments during full House Consideration of the bill.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Rep. John Garamendi

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Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from the Virgin Islands (Mrs. Christensen).

Del. Donna M.C. Christensen

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Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 4005, the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014. I want to thank the subcommittee chair, Chairman Hunter, and Subcommittee Ranking Member Garamendi, as well as Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member Rahall, for their leadership on the committee and their willingness to include language in the bill that would rectify a problem that has hurt the charter boat industry in my district, the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Section 312 of the bill would enable U.S.-owned passenger vessels operating in the Virgin Islands to carry up to 12 passengers, provided the vessels, of course, meet certain safety requirements, something our charter boat industry has been advocating for at least 20 years. Because of the existing rule, our once thriving charter yacht industry has gone to the British Virgin Islands, and estimates of revenue losses to the USVI economy range from $70 million to $100 million annually.

I also want to thank the Virgin Islands Marine Advisory Council for their invaluable assistance. I have been working on this change since coming to the House. And I can honestly say it is only because of their efforts and the support of Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member Rahall that we are on the cusp of finally resolving the issue. I thank them again, and I urge my colleagues to support H.R. 4005.

I rise in support of H.R. 4005, the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014.

I especially want to thank Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member Rahall for their willingness to include language in the bill that would clarify a problem with the Charter boat industry in my district, the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Section 312 of the bill would enable U.S. owned uninspected passenger vessels operating in the U.S. Virgin Islands to carry up to 12 passengers provided the vessels meet certain safety requirements. The Virgin Islands Charter boat industry has been advocating for this change for at least 20 years.

Because of the rule this section will change, our once thriving charter yacht industry has migrated to the British Virgin Islands where regulations are less restrictive. Estimates of revenue losses to the USVI economy because of the damage to this industry, range from $70 to $100 million annually. This is at a time when the territory's economy has not rebounded from the 2008 recession and the closure of largest private employer.

In closing Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Virgin Islands Marine Advisory Council for their invaluable assistance. I have been working on this change since coming to the House and I can honestly say that it is only because of their efforts and the support of Chairman Shuster and Ranking Member Rahall that we are on the cusp of finally resolving the issue.

I urge my colleagues to support H.R. 4005, as amended.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

Rep. John Garamendi

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Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

First, I just wanted to say that Congressman Rick Larsen entered his statement in the Record, and his statement speaks to the issue of the Coast Guard providing icebreaking services in the Arctic, and particularly the reconstruction of the polar sea.

I want to thank Mr. Hunter and the staff, Republican staff, and our staff on our side, David, and the people that worked on this particular piece of legislation.

This legislation is very important to the Coast Guard and to the American economy because it deals with the international trade. Ninety percent or more of the trade and services go by water. This bill provides the Coast Guard with the materials that it needs, with the budget authority, and with important reforms.

The legislation also provides considerable support for the Merchant Marine elements in our committee. It deals in part with the necessity for the national defense.

Chairman Hunter spoke to the issue of the Maritime Security Program. Similarly, the bill does speak to the Ready Reserve program as well as the breaking of ships, that is, the disposal of ships that have lost their usefulness. It is a comprehensive bill. There are a few more things that we should be doing in this piece of legislation that hopefully we will be able to take up in the Senate or in the conference committee.

I spoke earlier about the export of liquified natural gas, LNG. This is an enormous opportunity for America to rebuild its Merchant Marine. More than 100 ships will be needed to export that LNG. Those should be American-made ships, manned by American sailors, flying under the American flag.

I think we need, also, to work on title XI, the Loan Guarantee Program for ships that are built in the United States. It is very restrictive in its present form.

Chairman Hunter in his opening remarks also talked about the problem of the appropriations. While this bill does provide authorization authority that should be sufficient for all of these elements, the ultimate money available would be through the appropriation process.

I am very concerned about the austerity budgeting that has consumed this Congress for the last 3 years and appears to be continuing for the next 2. If that happens, all of the good intentions in this bill may be lost upon the shoals of an austerity budget. We need to pay attention to that.

It is a good piece of legislation. It has been a great honor to work on this subcommittee as the ranking member.

I yield back my remaining time, asking for a positive vote on this bill.

Rep. Duncan D. Hunter

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Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

I would like to thank the ranking member, Mr. Garamendi from California. He was great to work with on this. We had some disagreements, but we agree on the majority of it.

I would like to thank you for your support. It was great working with you, and we will do it more in the future.

I would also like to take into account what Mr. Garamendi said about an icebreaker. America is the only Arctic nation with no icebreaker. We don't have one. China has them; Russia has them; Canada has them. Just about everybody else that has any Arctic in its sphere of influence has an icebreaker, except for the United States; meaning, if an American oil ship got stuck in the Arctic, guess who would bail them out? Our good friend the Russians, maybe our good friends the Communist Chinese. The Canadians, if we are lucky, will have a ship available so we can at least go with a free country if we had to get that ship out of trouble.

We don't have an icebreaker. That is a travesty. Icebreakers are expensive, especially if you just buy one. They are about a billion dollars by the Coast Guard's account.

There are other options to get an icebreaker. You can lease an icebreaker like you lease a car, and it can be operated by merchant mariners, the same ones that we have been praising. Talking about this bill, that is who could run this icebreaker. We are going to work on that, and that should be this subcommittee and this committee's crowning achievement is getting an American icebreaker on the high seas to support American industry and American seafarers in the Arctic.

Number two, maritime transportation is more than just important to this country; it is what this country is all about. There is an old saying in the Department of Defense--and I was a marine, so let me just throw this out there--whoever controls the oceans controls the world. Now you can say whoever controls space controls the ocean, but whoever controls the oceans controls the world.

America is surrounded by water for the most part. All of our trade comes in through the Pacific or the Atlantic. It is more than important. It is the most important thing out there that we make sure of two things: that we protect these trade routes on the high seas for goods coming in and out of this country; number 2, we have to secure our ports and coastline from drugs, from illegal immigrants, and, most importantly, from a weapon of mass destruction that might be smuggled to our shoreline and then detonated by one of our port cities. That is easier to do than it is now to fly an airplane and land in an American airport and set something off. It is also easier to do than it is to cross the southern border and sneak across with some weapon of mass destruction. It is easier to get a ship or a cargo container ship with a weapon of mass destruction off of an American coast than it is to get it into this country any other way.

When it comes to maritime transportation, Americans are leading the way in making these ships. We just made in San Diego, a company called NASSCO, a shipbuilding company in San Diego just built or is in the process of building right now the very first liquified natural gas-powered ships. They are not container ships that carry liquified natural gas, LNG, but they are powered by it. They are the first ones in the world. They are being made here in this country. So we might not be able to make cheap ships as easily as nations that don't have the same labor laws or environmental laws, but we can still make the most technologically advanced ships in the world, and we are doing that today.

Lastly, the Coast Guard, approximately 41,000 military personnel--and to my friends that say that the U.S. Coast Guard should be under Homeland Security, the Coast Guard is a fifth branch of the U.S. military. It is actually under DOD. So if we want to move it anywhere, I would say put it under the Armed Services Committee.

Approximately 41,000 military personnel, 8,000 reservists, 8,500 civilian employees, and 30,000 volunteers of the Coast Guard Auxiliary comprise this adaptable responsive military force within the Department of Homeland Security.

As one the Nation's five Armed Forces, the Coast Guard also is prepared to operate as a specialized service to the Navy in times of war or at the President's direction. The Coast Guard is instrumental to the security of our Nation and our maritime transportation system of this Nation which, both of those, are, in turn, the most important things that we can look at when it comes to the high seas and maintaining a robust economy and secure shores.

With that, Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.

Rep. Rick Larsen

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Mr. Speaker, the Arctic is fast becoming the 21st-century version of the Northwest Passage. Just four years ago, two German ships followed a Russian icebreaker to complete the first commercial shipment across the Arctic. Last year, with the warmest Arctic summer on record, 46 ships made the crossing. An active and well-maintained icebreaker fleet is a key part of our country's responsibility as an Arctic nation.

As Ranking Member of the Coast Guard subcommittee in the 112th Congress, I had the privilege to work with Representative LoBiondo, who was the Chairman at that time. We agreed it was time for the Coast Guard to make a decision about how to move forward with its icebreaker fleet. In the last Coast Guard reauthorization bill, we asked the agency to look at the business case for reactivating the Polar Sea, which is currently docked in Seattle.

That analysis showed that for about $100 million, we could have a functioning Polar Sea, which is about one-tenth the price tag for a brand new icebreaker. In my view that is a bargain.

However, the Coast Guard still has not come to a conclusion about what to do with the Polar Sea. Instead, it is currently sitting in cold storage in Seattle. Every day the Polar Sea sits without maintenance it loses value.

The bill before us would require the Coast Guard to use the analysis Representative LoBiondo and I requested and make a decision about the Polar Sea.

I was pleased to hear Coast Guard Admiral Papp talk about reactivation of the Polar Sea in a positive light during a subcommittee hearing last week. I believe the right course of action is to reactivate the Polar Sea.

But that decision needs to be made soon.

The Coast Guard also needs to start moving on the next generation of icebreakers.

I understand that the intent of this legislation is to encourage the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation and other interested agencies to partner with the Coast Guard in building a new fleet of icebreakers.

However, I am concerned that by tying the Coast Guard's hands until those agencies fully engage in this process, we may be delaying much needed progress towards building a new icebreaker.

That's why I am pleased that Chairman Duncan and Ranking Member Garamendi included some changes I requested to the icebreaker language in this bill to ensure that we do not hinder what little progress is being made on icebreakers today.

I hope we can continue to work together to ensure our country meets its responsibilities as an Arctic nation.

I urge my colleagues to support this bill.

Rep. Frank A. LoBiondo

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Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 4005, the ``Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act.'' I want to commend Chairman Hunter, Ranking Member Garamendi, and their staffs for the amount of work they put in to have this bipartisan measure brought to the floor.

This important legislation contains a provision based on the ``Commercial Vessel Discharges Reform Act of 2013'' introduced by myself and Mr. Larsen. This provision puts in place a permanent moratorium from Environmental Protection Agency, state regulations and fines governing incidental discharges from commercial fishing vessels and all other commercial vessels less than 79 feet. With our stagnant economy, the government must not enact federal penalties which could discourage economic growth and job creation. The fines that are scheduled to be levied against our commercial fishermen for incidental charges will be devastating to our national and local South Jersey businesses.

In conclusion, I'd also like to praise the tireless efforts on behalf of all Coasties that our colleague Mr. Coble has worked on during his entire career in the House. A Coasty himself, he has always fought for the men and women serving in this distinguished uniform and we will surely miss him.

I urge all my colleagues to support H.R. 4005.

The question is on the motion offered by the gentleman from California (Mr. Hunter) that the House suspend the rules and pass the bill, H.R. 4005, as amended.

The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the rules were suspended and the bill, as amended, was passed.

A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.