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Occurrences in the Congressional Record

Entry Title Date
Recognizing Chase Ewoldt For His Courage And Service May 8, 2015
Peter Roskam, R-IL
"Mr. Speaker, I am honored to rise today to recognize Chase Ewoldt, a brave, strong, and exceptional young man from the Sixth District of Illinois. Chase was recently named one of the five ambassadors nationwide for the St. Baldrick’s foundation. In July 2012, at the age of two, Chase was diagnosed with a rare, aggressive brain and spinal cancer. Experts believe this specific type of cancer is found in just 100 to 200 new patients every year in the United States and Chase was only given a 20% chance of survival. Over the next 14 months, his family and friends watched him undergo punishing cancer therapy every two to three weeks. Most of his time was spent in and out of hospitals. Nevertheless, Chase beat the odds and survived. In August of 2013 there was no longer any sign of the disease in his body. Chase is not completely out of the woods, and will most likely struggle with aspects of the disease for the rest of his life, but for now the family is celebrating his health and trying to raise awareness about pediatric cancer, a testament not only to Chase’s strength and resilience, but also the entire family’s compassion and determination to help others. Chase is an inspiration to all with cancer and I am sure he will continue to be a light for those in darkness. As Chase told his mother, “I am a survivor”. Let us celebrate the life of this survivor. Mr. Speaker and Distinguished Colleagues, please join me in honoring and celebrating Chase Ewoldt’s nomination as a nationwide ambassador for the St. Baldrick’s foundation."
Public Service Recognition Week May 7, 2015
Thomas Carper, D-DE
"As you may know, on October 29, 2012—at least we know in Delaware, New Jersey, and New York—Superstorm Sandy made landfall in the United States. Its impact up and down the east coast was, in a word, devastating. In another word, it was heartbreaking. New York, New Jersey, and parts of New England were hit particularly hard. My home State of Delaware was hit hard, too. Widespread flooding caused severe damage to many homes and businesses. Our transportation infrastructure suffered, too. Roads and bridges were damaged or washed out, hurting commerce and transportation and cutting off access to hospitals, schools, and work."
Concurrent Resolution On The Budget, Fiscal Year 2016 April 15, 2015
Bernard Sanders, I-VT
"At a time when the wealthiest 400 Americans—400 Americans—paid a tax rate of 16.7 percent in 2012, at a time when hedge fund managers pay a lower effective tax rate than working families, truckdrivers, and nurses, what the Republican budget does based on an amendment they did abolishes the estate tax. The estate tax provides a $269 billion tax break. For whom? For the middle class? Good. Low-income people? That is great. Not so. This repeal of the estate tax applies to the wealthiest—not 1 percent, but the top two-tenths of 1 percent. Republicans passed a tax proposal which impacts the top two-tenths of 1 percent and leaves nothing for 99.8 percent of Americans. Cut education, cut health care, cut nutrition, and give the tax breaks to billionaires. By repealing the estate tax, the average tax breaks for multimillionaires and billionaires would be about $3 million."
Statements On Introduced Bills And Joint Resolutions January 6, 2015
Dianne Feinstein, D-CA
"The most disturbing example is that of elephants and rhinoceroses. A recent study estimates that over 100,000 elephants were illegally poached in Africa from 2010 to 2012. At this rate, the African elephant is being killed faster than the species can reproduce, putting it at risk of being wiped off the face of the earth."
Honoring Neil Armstrong July 25, 2014
Jim Jordan, R-OH
"Mr. Speaker, on Sunday we marked the 45th anniversary of Ohio’s native son Neil Armstrong taking what he famously called “one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” Neil Armstrong was born in 1930 on a farm near Wapakoneta. He earned his student’s pilot license at age 16, reached the rank of Eagle Scout, and graduated from Blume High School before enrolling at Purdue University on a Navy scholarship. He was called to active duty by the Navy in 1949, serving as a naval aviator until 1952. He later served 17 years as an engineer, test pilot, astronaut, and administrator for NASA and its predecessor agency. Despite his lifetime of service, he is best remembered for one day: July 20, 1969, when he capped a 240,000-mile journey through space, stepped off the “Eagle,” and became the first human to walk on the surface of the moon. Neil Armstrong died in 2012 at the age of 82, but the impact of his journey is still felt today—in rural Auglaize County, Ohio, and throughout the world. Mr. Speaker, we honor Neil Armstrong for his service and sacrifice—this day and always."

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