Capitol Words a project of the Sunlight Foundation

  • and

confederate

Occurrences over time

embed
  • Embed Dark
  • Embed Light
  1. '96
  2. '98
  3. '00
  4. '02
  5. '04
  6. '06
  7. '08
  8. '10
  9. '12
  10. '14
  11. '16

Mentioned most often by

Occurrences in the Congressional Record

Entry Title Date
Remembering Senator Bumpers January 7, 2016
Bruce Westerman, R-AR
"He went on to serve on the local school board before mounting multiple successful bids for statewide office. Charleston Public School District is not only known for producing stellar graduates and for the Tigers’ powerhouse football program, but for heeding Dale Bumpers’ advice in 1954 and becoming the first public school in the former Confederate States to desegregate."
Recognizing The 2015 Honorees Of The Fairfax County Branch Of The Naacp December 10, 2015
Gerald Connolly, D-VA
"Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate the 2015 Honorees of the Fairfax County Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The Fairfax Branch is recognized as the NAACP’s first rural chapter. In 1915, a few brave African American citizens in Falls Church, Virginia, fought a proposed ordinance that would have segregated housing. They called themselves the Colored Citizens Protective League (CCPL) and the group evolved to become the Fairfax County Branch of the NAACP. Since its inception, the NAACP has promoted equal rights and justice for all and has shown a spotlight on issues of great importance including civil rights, education, voting rights, desegregation, and prison reform. I have been honored to work with this organization and pledge my continued support of our shared goals. Each year, the Fairfax County NAACP honors several deserving individuals and organizations that have shown extraordinary support of the Branch or the community. I am honored to submit the names of the following award winners: President’s Awardees: Cassie Marcotty, Abby Conde, Anna Rowan, Lidia Amanuel, and Marley Finley. These high school student leaders formed “Students of Change,” now known as CAALM (an acronym of their initials), to spearhead the initiative to rename JEB Stuart High School as Thurgood Marshall High and to remove all symbols and mascots that honor the Confederate Legacy. The President’s Award will also be presented to Virginia House of Delegates member Scott A. Surovell of the 44th District, for his exceptional leadership and support to the communities of Hybla Valley and Gum Springs in southern Fairfax County. Community Service Awardees: Debbie Kilpatrick for her exceptional leadership, advocacy, and dedication as President of the Fairfax County Council of PTAs. Celeste Peterson for establishing the Erin Peterson Scholarship Fund and her devotion to the Young Men’s Leadership Group at Westfield High School. Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join me in congratulating the 2015 honorees of the Fairfax County NAACP and in thanking them for their tremendous contributions to our youth and our community."
Focusing On Working Families October 28, 2015
Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-NJ
"This body has voted four times in support of the Confederate battle flag, but we have taken no votes on legislation that will level the playing field for working Americans. This body has voted against a solid, long-term transportation and infrastructure bill five times, and we have taken no votes on legislation to boost American wages. This body has voted countless times to undermine the Affordable Care Act or endanger women’s access to health care, but we have taken no votes on legislation to help families balance the needs of work and their personal lives. That is in spite of statements from Members like the Republican nominee for Speaker who just last week indicated he wouldn’t run for the position unless he would be allowed to set aside time to spend with his family."
Honor Our Fallen Heroes Act October 23, 2015
Frank Guinta, R-NH
"Pam discovered that Private Samuel Zortman died at the age of 21 in a Confederate prison camp. Conditions were brutal. He died of starvation. His captors buried him in a mass grave and has since been moved to a national cemetery in South Carolina. An empty tomb near his hometown in Pennsylvania memorializes Private Zortman; but despite ample evidence of his service and death as a POW, the Veterans Health Administration cannot award him a headstone at a U.S. military cemetery."
Tsa Office Of Inspection Accountability Act Of 2015 September 30, 2015
David Price, D-NC
"Apparently the answer is “yes”. The Senate couldn’t pass a single appropriations bill. The House passed a few with Republican votes alone, and then the process collapsed under the weight of the Confederate battle flag debate. That was a particularly disgraceful episode, but the process was already on life support. It was never going to work, and Republican leaders have known that all year."

Popularity by state

Popularity by party