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wildfires

Occurrences over time

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  2. '98
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  4. '02
  5. '04
  6. '06
  7. '08
  8. '10
  9. '12
  10. '15

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Occurrences in the Congressional Record

Entry Title Date
Climate Change February 2, 2015
Sheldon Whitehouse, D-RI
"This is no radical with some political agenda. This is a fact sheet from a State scientific agency. It happens to be Oklahoma’s. Here is what the agency expects this means for Oklahoma: earlier maturation of winter wheat and orchard crops, leaving them more vulnerable to late freeze events; drought frequency increases, especially during the summer; drier and warmer conditions increasing the risk of wildfires; rain-free periods lengthening with individual rainfall events becoming more intense, with more runoff and flash flooding occurring."
Thanking San Diego Fire Department And Chief Brian Fennessy January 28, 2015
Scott Peters, D-CA
"Mr. Speaker, today I rise to highlight San Diegan Brian Fennessy, assistant fire chief of the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department, who is here in D.C. sharing his expertise fighting wildfires so that communities across the country can be better prepared."
Keystone Xl Pipeline Act January 21, 2015
Bernard Sanders, I-VT
"Observations throughout the world make it clear that climate change is occurring, and rigorous scientific research demonstrates that the greenhouse gases emitted by human activities are the primary driver. These conclusions are based on multiple independent lines of evidence, and contrary assertions are inconsistent with an objective assessment of the vast body of peer reviewed science. Moreover, there is strong evidence that ongoing climate change will have broad impacts on society, including the global economy and on the environment. For the United States, climate change impacts include sea level rise for coastal states, greater threats of extreme weather events, and increase risk of regional water scarcity, urban heat waves, western wildfires, and a disturbance of biological systems throughout the country. The severity of climate change impacts is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades."
Keystone Xl Pipeline January 7, 2015
Bernard Sanders, I-VT
"Observations throughout the world make it clear that climate change is occurring, and rigorous scientific research demonstrates that the greenhouse gases emitted by human activities are the primary driver. These conclusions are based on multiple independent lines of evidence, and contrary assertions are inconsistent with an objective assessment of the vast body of peer-reviewed science. Moreover, there is strong evidence that ongoing climate change will have broad impacts on society, including the global economy and on the environment. For the United States, climate change impacts include sea level rise for coastal states, greater threats of extreme weather events, and increased risk of regional water scarcity, urban heat waves, western wildfires, and a disturbance of biological systems throughout the country. The severity of climate change impacts is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades."
Climate Change January 7, 2015
Sheldon Whitehouse, D-RI
"The scientific warnings about what this means are now starting to be matched in our experience with unprecedented rain bursts and droughts, wildfires and heat seasons, sea levels and ocean temperatures. In the tropic seas, coral reefs are dying off at startling rates; in the Arctic seas, sea ice is vanishing at levels never recorded until now. Everywhere the oceans shout a warning to those who will listen. Rhode Island, as a coastal State, as the Ocean State, is particularly hard hit. We get the land problems such as the rain bursts heavily associated with climate change, which in 2010 brought unprecedented flooding along our historic rivers. We have the sea level rise. It is expected now to be several feet by the end of the century—by a warming sea that has also disturbed our fisheries and distressed our fishing economy. “It is not my grandfather’s ocean out there,” as one commercial fisherman told me."

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